How I react or choose not to react is Asmitā…….

asmita

“I know something and I am presented with something different.
How I react or choose not to react is Asmitā.
The wrong response brings Duḥkha.
The right response Viveka.
One is a hasty assessment and one is wanting to find out more.
One is ‘assuming I know I proceed’,
the other is ‘wishing to know I proceed’.”
– TKV Desikachar commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

Yoga is about cultivating a profound discernment of the……

viveka

Yoga is about cultivating a profound discernment
of the difference between
the Nature of our Being and
the Being of our Nature.
Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 12-16

Clarity is the ability to see clearly three things and to understand them….

Clarity is the ability to see clearly three things and to understand them:
the cause, the effect and that which knows both the cause and the effect.”
– TKV Desikachar from unedited manuscript for ‘What are We Seeking?’

The arrangement of Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two involves four components….

Patanjali_3

“The arrangement of Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two involves four components:
1. Duḥkha
What is it that I want to avoid?
2. Avidyā/Saṃyoga
Association or from where has this come?
3. Kaivalya/Viveka
Where should we be in order to be free from this association?
4. Viveka/Aṣṭāṅga
What is the way?
What is the discipline that will give Viveka,
not just for a moment, but there all the time?
This is the place of Yoga.”
– TKV Desikachar January 9th 1999

The first Viveka is that I lack something……

viveka

“The first Viveka is that I lack something.
If that urgency is not there then no technique will work.
There must be a very strong thirst.”
– TKV Desikachar

All (Yoga) techniques are for Viveka, as this is the means for freedom.

viveka

“All (Yoga) techniques are for Viveka,
as this is the means for freedom.”
– TKV Desikachar

How we look at something depends on what is within us.

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“How we look at something depends on what is within us.”
– Notes from my studies of the Dhyānamālika
with TKV Desikachar in Chennai December 2000

There are some who are ruled by how they perceive the world as treating them.

duhkha_4a

There are some who are ruled by how they perceive the world as treating them.
There are others who reflect on how they are treating the world.
– Reflections on Yoga Sūtra Chapter 2 verse 15

Śikṣaṇa Krama – do something perfectly or correctly……

Āsana_12

Śikṣaṇa Krama – do something perfectly or correctly.
Anything is taught to achieve perfection in the practice of Āsana and Prāṇāyāma.
In other words teaching children and healthy people where you can take risks with no problems.
Not a valid approach for groups.
We need to use intelligence and Viveka,
not follow the idea of no pain, no gain to become painless,
or to get to a point without suffering.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

Even Duḥkha is a great teacher……

duhkha_3

“The way to better oneself is not to ponder over the past but to look ahead.
Even Duḥkha is a great teacher.
In fact it is the first and important step in the ladder of Viveka or clarity.
The greatness of Patañjali is to look at Duḥkha as the stepping stone to success.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 16

Until we see through the illusion of life……

samkhya_small

Until we see through the illusion of life,
we will be unable to see,
through the illusion of life.

Yoga is about recognising change and recognising that which recognises change.

samkhya_small

Yoga is about recognising change and recognising that which recognises change.

We are always experiencing Duḥkha even though some of us might not be seeking clarity.

duhkha_5

“We are always experiencing Duḥkha
even though some of us might not be seeking clarity.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Five Page 79

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Five Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Five Theory: Duḥkha and the Concept of Saṃskāra – Pages 69-79

read more

I may not feel ‘better’ after a practice……

I may not feel ‘better’ after a practice.
I always feel ‘different’ after a practice.
That difference offers new views within old patterns.

Clarity and confusion follow each other in cycles……

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House“In the Yoga Sūtra it is said that in the beginning of one’s Sādhana,
clarity and confusion follow each other in cycles, like a wave form”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter One Page 9

Viveka is to be able to understand and appreciate opposites.

viveka

Viveka is to be able to understand and appreciate opposites.”
– TKV Desikachar 1980

The problem is in the mind and the key is in the mind.

“The problem is in the mind
and the key is in the mind.”
– TKV Desikachar

Abhyāsa is the practice that leads to Viveka……

viveka

Abhyāsa is the practice that leads to Viveka,
the state which there are no external distractions to prevent clear perception.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 14

Show how The word Hāna in Yoga Sūtra C2 v25 has the meaning ’giving up’.

Yoga Sūtra Study Question 8.

patanjali-1

Show how The word Hāna in Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 25 has the meaning ’giving up’.
What is the ’giving up’ in question?
How is it obtained?
To Download or View this Question as a PDF Study Sheet

Even if one’s Guru says a certain thing will happen and it happens……

vikalpa

“Even if one’s Guru says a certain thing will happen and it happens,
that is still Vikalpa, as it has not gone through the necessary progression.
When you take the word of the Guru for authority,
unless you put it through the process of discriminative investigation (Viveka),
the mere acceptance of it, even if true, because it suits your fancy
i.e. Vikalpa, will not make it valid for you.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

Thus Yukti Anumāna or skilful inference through the process of……

The witness cannot be witnessed.
Yoga Sūtra C4 v21

Thus Yukti Anumāna or skilful inference through the process of ne’iti, ne’iti or not this, not that, is seen as a means to understand all except that, which cannot be identified, yet still expresses the essence of existence.

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Patañjali
 was 
very 
prophetic, 
because 
he spoke
 not 
only
 of……

Patañjali
 was 
very 
prophetic, 
because 
he spoke
 not 
only
 of 
yesterday’s 
mind, 
but 
also
 of
 tomorrow’s.
His 
message 
concerns 
clarity,
 and it 
will 
become 
more 
and 
more 
pertinent
 as
 time 
goes 
by,
because 
people 
are 
now
 questioning 
much 
more 
than
 before.”
TKV Desikachar France May 1999

Suffering is the starting point……

duhkha_5

“Suffering is the starting point for the Yoga journey of four steps from:
the symptom (Duḥkha or suffering);
through to the cause (Avidyā or illusion);
to the path (Kaivalya or independence);
and the means (Aṣṭāṅga or 8 limbed path) for Viveka or discrimination.
This fourfold process is at the heart of Yoga, Āyurveda and Buddhism.”

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