The mind is like a fluid, which can modify into different things……

“The mind is like a fluid,
which can modify into different things.
A sense of change.
Thus restraining modifications is channelising.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

What we observe today might not be the same tomorrow.

parinama

“What we observe today might not be the same tomorrow.”
From study notes with TKV Desikachar England 1992

The mind is subject to change or Pariṇāma and as such can be channelised.

TKV_France_1999

“The mind is subject to change or Pariṇāma and as such can be channelised.
Certain movements can be emphasised or de-emphasised.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

The learning process is only possible with Pariṇāma.

parinama

“The learning process is only possible with Pariṇāma.
Remembering what you have learned is only possible with Saṃskāra.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Yoga is about recognising change and recognising that which recognises change.

samkhya_small

Yoga is about recognising change and recognising that which recognises change.

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Six Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Six Theory: Puruṣa and Prakṛti – Pages 81-90

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I may not feel ‘better’ after a practice……

I may not feel ‘better’ after a practice.
I always feel ‘different’ after a practice.
That difference offers new views within old patterns.

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Three Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added Yoga Sūtra verse and word cross-references to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Three Theory: The Concepts of Avidyā and Duḥkha – Pages 31-44

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Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter One Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House
‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added Yoga Sūtra verse and word cross-references to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter One Theory: The Meaning and Purpose of Yoga Pages 1-12

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I still do not know the answer until I meet the person……

I still do not know the answer until I meet the person

Question from Paul Harvey

If I may conclude with an awkward question. For somebody reading this interview they would perhaps understand from it that Yoga is not a straightforward means of for this problem this solution.

Yet there are many, many Yoga books already on the marketplace that offer precisely this, almost as a glossy self-help manual with quite specific links between postures and diseases or breathing techniques and diseases, between techniques and illnesses.

What have you to say to the reader with this respect, because there is this large body of, I cannot say evidence of, there is this large body of information that is there. What is the reader to do? With all this what can help?

Response from TKV Desikachar

There is such a large body of information that is there which tells that this disease can be cured by this posture or by this breathing that I wonder if the reader should think why there are more and more people and more and more sicknesses if all these solutions are there.

I think most of the doctors must close their shop, but it has not happened and how many of these authors who have written these things can really honestly say there have been out of these problems they are talking about.

Today if somebody comes to me after how many years now, thirty nine years I have been teaching, if somebody comes to me with all this experience I still do not know the answer until I meet the person, interact with the person I do not know what is possible even if it is a simple headache.

– Extract from Interview with TKV Desikachar by Paul Harvey in 2000 on ‘Science, Medical Conditions and Yoga as a Therapy’.

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Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra looks at the world as real……

sat

“Another aspect of Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra
is that he looks at the world as real.
It is Sat. It is not Asat.
It is not a mirage.
Even the mirage is real.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 42

The goal of Yoga is the personal exploration of the reality of…….

The goal of Yoga is the personal exploration of the reality of impermanence
rather than the media exploitation of the desire for permanence.

There is a relationship between Pariṇāma Tāpa and Saṃskāra.

parinama

“There is a relationship between Pariṇāma, Tāpa and Saṃskāra.
When you recognise this phenomena there is something that recognises it.
That something is not part of the phenomena.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

A Yogi is one in who Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra are in harmony……

avidya

“A Yogi is one in who Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra are in harmony.
When there is no harmony there is the wrong combination of Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra.
This is known as Avidyā or not knowing a thing as it is.
The right combination is Vidyā.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Duḥkha and the absence of Duḥkha on the mental level is due to Saṃskāra and Pariṇāma……

duhkha_5

Duḥkha and the absence of Duḥkha on the mental level is due to Saṃskāra and Pariṇāma.
With no Saṃskāra the mind is dead.
With no Pariṇāma the mind is not alive.
With the two we try to strike a balance,
to have the two in harmony.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

The practice of Yoga is an attempt to influence Saṃskāra and Pariṇāma……

samskara

“The practice of Yoga is an attempt to influence Saṃskāra and Pariṇāma in a  positive way.
If not the practice is wrong.
Therefore Yoga is a Saṃskāra which gradually changes from old Saṃskāra.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Depending on what and how you feed Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra……

parinama

“Depending on what and how you feed Pariṇāma and Saṃskāra you can have good or bad reactions.
Pariṇāma relates to perception, Saṃskāra relates to memory.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Without Saṃskāra there can be no evolution, memory, action……

samskara

“Without Saṃskāra there can be no evolution, memory, action.
There would only be Pariṇāma or constant change.
So Saṃskāra can be good or bad.
The mind is basically neutral.
It depends on what happens to us.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Pariṇāma is change and can be from one moment to the next……

parinama

Pariṇāma is change and can be from one moment to the next.
Suppose we are listening to music we like, a Saṃskāra or tendency,
and something happens to jar the appreciation.
The change is immediate and opposite to how we were.
Thus the Saṃskāra of listening to a particular style of music causes friction when there is change.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

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