Duḥkha is the mental activity that brings impurities into the……

Duḥkha is the mental activity
that brings impurities into the heart,
thus disturbing it.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 31

So in many Yoga schools the beginning of change is suffering…..

duhkha_5

“So in many Yoga schools the beginning of change is suffering.
We find ourselves in a situation that we don’t like.
Even if we can do 500 Āsana or recite the Yoga Sūtra this suffering can be there.
It is the absence of suffering that is the measure of Yoga.”
– TKV Desikachar

What is unpleasant is not desired…….

dvesa

“What is unpleasant is not desired.
The response of the mind is then to move away from it.
Whether in fact such a step did prevent Duḥkha is not immediately evident.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 8

How I react or choose not to react is Asmitā…….

asmita

“I know something and I am presented with something different.
How I react or choose not to react is Asmitā.
The wrong response brings Duḥkha.
The right response Viveka.
One is a hasty assessment and one is wanting to find out more.
One is ‘assuming I know I proceed’,
the other is ‘wishing to know I proceed’.”
– TKV Desikachar commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

Good habits can be as enslaving as bad ones……

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

“Good habits can be as enslaving as bad ones and can also lead to Duḥkha.”
– T Krishnamacharya

Recognising AND accepting one’s Duḥkham is the first……

prajna

“Recognising AND accepting one’s Duḥkha is the first Prajñā.
Once you have accepted this you are free to find out where it is coming from.”
– TKV Desikachar January 9th 1999

Duḥkha is the expression of a problem……

duhkha_5

Duḥkha is the expression of a problem.
Duḥkha is an emotion,
it could be an illusion.”
From study notes with TKV Desikachar England 1992

The arrangement of Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two involves four components….

Patanjali_3

“The arrangement of Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two involves four components:
1. Duḥkha
What is it that I want to avoid?
2. Avidyā/Saṃyoga
Association or from where has this come?
3. Kaivalya/Viveka
Where should we be in order to be free from this association?
4. Viveka/Aṣṭāṅga
What is the way?
What is the discipline that will give Viveka,
not just for a moment, but there all the time?
This is the place of Yoga.”
– TKV Desikachar January 9th 1999

Where there is Duḥkha, there is Avidyā.

duhkha

‎”Where there is Duḥkha, there is Avidyā.”
– TKV Desikachar 1995

Negative reasoning such as harming and the rest……

Patanjali Yoga Sutra

vitarkāḥ hiṃsā-ādayaḥ
kṛta-kārita-anumoditāḥ
lobha-krodha-moha-pūrvakāḥ
mṛdu-madhya-adhimātrāḥ
duḥkha-ajñāna-ananta-phalāḥ
iti pratipakṣa-bhāvanam |

“Negative reasoning such as harming and the rest;
may be done, brought about, or by approval;
is preceded by greed, anger or delusion;
may be mild, moderate or intense;
its infinite fruits are suffering and ignorance;
thus cultivate the opposite side.”
– Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 34

There are some who are ruled by how they perceive the world as treating them.

duhkha_4a

There are some who are ruled by how they perceive the world as treating them.
There are others who reflect on how they are treating the world.
– Reflections on Yoga Sūtra Chapter 2 verse 15

No medicine can reduce Duḥkha, only Kriyā Yoga.

duhkha_4a

“No medicine can reduce Duḥkha, only Kriyā Yoga.”
– TKV Desikachar commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Even Duḥkha is a great teacher……

duhkha_3

“The way to better oneself is not to ponder over the past but to look ahead.
Even Duḥkha is a great teacher.
In fact it is the first and important step in the ladder of Viveka or clarity.
The greatness of Patañjali is to look at Duḥkha as the stepping stone to success.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 16

Impurities in the heart cause mental agitation……

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

Impurities in the heart cause mental agitation
– anxiety, lack of direction, anger.
This agitation, in turn, affects the body,
sometimes making it impossible to sit still even for a few minutes.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 31

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Suffering is basically either the result of the……

duhkhaSuffering is basically either the result of the absence of something that we want,
or the presence of something that we don’t want.”
– TKV Desikachar from unedited manuscript for ‘What are We Seeking?’

We usually start seeking because we have something which we do not want……

“We usually start seeking because we have something which we do not want: suffering.
Suffering pushes us to seek.”
– TKV Desikachar from unedited manuscript for ‘What are We Seeking?’

Duḥkha arises because of change, greed and conditioning……

tk5_1980

“This Sūtra describes the origin of Duḥkha.
Duḥkha arises because of change, greed and conditioning.
Besides the Guṇa cause inherent changes unexpectedly.
This disturbs balance and Duḥkha follows.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 15

Yoga is not for Everybody……

duhkha

Even though we might say Āsana is for Every Body,
we can’t say Yoga is for Everybody.

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Six Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Six Theory: Puruṣa and Prakṛti – Pages 81-90

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When the mind thinks it is seeing rather than the Puruṣa there is Avidyā

Desikachar_1999_1
“When the mind thinks it is seeing rather than the Puruṣa there is Avidyā,
and this is the beginning of Duḥkha.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Six Page 85

Who is suffering?……

duhkha_5

“Who is suffering?
Who is recognising it?
What can release this suffering?”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 23

We are always experiencing Duḥkha even though some of us might not be seeking clarity.

duhkha_5

“We are always experiencing Duḥkha
even though some of us might not be seeking clarity.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Five Page 79

The only Duḥkha that matters is that which is about to come.

duhkha_5

“The only Duḥkha that matters is that which is about to come.
Things that have happened or are happening must be accepted.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Five Page 74

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Five Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Five Theory: Duḥkha and the Concept of Saṃskāra – Pages 69-79

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When somebody says ‘this doesn’t bother me’, they are already bothered.

“When somebody says ‘this doesn’t bother me’, they are already bothered.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Five Page 79

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