The search for understanding is driven by misunderstanding……

avidya

“The search for understanding is driven by misunderstanding,
though not always in the right direction.”
– Reflections on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

Avidyā is anything else other than Vidyā.

avidya

Avidyā is anything else other than Vidyā.”
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 3
– TKV Desikachar January 1997

There are essentially three causes for fear….

abhinivesa

“There are essentially three causes for fear….
desire, disease and death.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 9

Duḥkha is the expression of a problem……

duhkha_5

Duḥkha is the expression of a problem.
Duḥkha is an emotion,
it could be an illusion.”
From study notes with TKV Desikachar England 1992

The arrangement of Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two involves four components….

Patanjali_3

“The arrangement of Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two involves four components:
1. Duḥkha
What is it that I want to avoid?
2. Avidyā/Saṃyoga
Association or from where has this come?
3. Kaivalya/Viveka
Where should we be in order to be free from this association?
4. Viveka/Aṣṭāṅga
What is the way?
What is the discipline that will give Viveka,
not just for a moment, but there all the time?
This is the place of Yoga.”
– TKV Desikachar January 9th 1999

Nothing destroys Vāsanā, only they become ineffective.

vasana

‎”Nothing destroys Vāsanā,
only they become ineffective.”
– TKV Desikachar January 11th 1995

We may have intellectual Vidyā, but in reality we follow……

avidya

“We may have intellectual Vidyā,
but in reality we follow some deeper force of Avidyā.”
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 3
– TKV Desikachar January 1997

Yoga offers me an intelligent way to come out of my mistakes.

avidya

Yoga offers me an intelligent way to come out of my mistakes.

Where there is Duḥkha, there is Avidyā.

duhkha

‎”Where there is Duḥkha, there is Avidyā.”
– TKV Desikachar 1995

All these Kleśa are variable in their potency……

All these Kleśa are variable in their potency

“All these Kleśa are variable in their potency.
They can be so weak, that they hardly matter.
Sometime they take a feeble form, when they can be easily contained.
If not they rise to dominance.  When in domination, only one takes over.
For example in the most evolved stage when Rāga is dominant,
other Kleśa such as Dveṣa are not apparent.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 4

If we start from Kleśa our action will be faulty.

If we start from Kleśa our action will be faulty.

“If we start from Kleśa our action will be faulty.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

Prāṇāyāma reduces Avidyā and clarity arises in the mind

jalandhara_bandha

“The Yoga Sūtra says that as we practice Prāṇāyāma,
more and more of the covering of the mind,
Avidyā, is removed and there is clarity.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Ten Page 137

When something is understood differently from what it truly is, it is called Avidyā.

IWYS_M1

“When something is understood differently from what it truly is, it is called Avidyā.
What is changing is taken to be non-changing. For example the mind.
What is subjected to decay is assumed to be pure. For example the body.
What is leading to suffering is taken to be the source of pleasure.
What is not conscious is assumed to be conscious.
All these errors in perceptions have many possibilities.
But the ultimate stage of Avidyā is to assume that we are the Masters, not Īśvara.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra C2 v5

Yoga is not for Everybody……

duhkha

Even though we might say Āsana is for Every Body,
we can’t say Yoga is for Everybody.

A necessary step in Yoga is to experience a state of disillusionment……

kali2

A necessary step in Yoga is to experience a state of complete and utter disillusionment.
Arising from that is a state of Citta prepared to give up its conviction of being the Cit.

– Commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

What good is the sword of wisdom (Jñāna Asinā)……

bhujangasana

“What good is the sword of wisdom (Jñāna Asinā),
to cut away the chains of doubt (Saṃśaya),
if the holder is too weak to bear it.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on the Bhagavad Gītā Chapter 4 verse 42

Until we see through the illusion of life……

samkhya_small

Until we see through the illusion of life,
we will be unable to see,
through the illusion of life.

The association with the world full of form and change starts with the mind……

baradavajrasana

“The association with the world full of form and change starts with the mind.
Suffering caused because of this association is an eye opener.
Who is suffering?
Who is recognising it?
What can release this suffering?
All these questions exist because of this association,
even though it may often be painful”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 23

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Six Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Six Theory: Puruṣa and Prakṛti – Pages 81-90

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When the mind thinks it is seeing rather than the Puruṣa there is Avidyā

Desikachar_1999_1
“When the mind thinks it is seeing rather than the Puruṣa there is Avidyā,
and this is the beginning of Duḥkha.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Six Page 85

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Five Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Five Theory: Duḥkha and the Concept of Saṃskāra – Pages 69-79

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Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Three Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added Yoga Sūtra verse and word cross-references to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Three Theory: The Concepts of Avidyā and Duḥkha – Pages 31-44

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Yoga is about looking inwards at what we fear most rather than……

Yoga is about looking inwards at what we fear most,
rather than looking outwards at what we desire most.

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter One Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House
‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added Yoga Sūtra verse and word cross-references to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter One Theory: The Meaning and Purpose of Yoga Pages 1-12

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Clarity and confusion follow each other in cycles……

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House“In the Yoga Sūtra it is said that in the beginning of one’s Sādhana,
clarity and confusion follow each other in cycles, like a wave form”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter One Page 9

Pages: 12