What is unpleasant is not desired…….

dvesa

“What is unpleasant is not desired.
The response of the mind is then to move away from it.
Whether in fact such a step did prevent Duḥkha is not immediately evident.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 8

Knowledge from the past prevails and influences me…..

asmita

“Knowledge from the past prevails and influences me to either judge or inquire.
Assuming my knowledge and my memory and I proceed is Asmitā Kleśa.
Assuming that I may be wrong and wishing to find out more is Asmitā Jñāna.
However to hesitate completely or question everything is Asmitā Kleśa.”
– TKV Desikachar commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

How I react or choose not to react is Asmitā…….

asmita

“I know something and I am presented with something different.
How I react or choose not to react is Asmitā.
The wrong response brings Duḥkha.
The right response Viveka.
One is a hasty assessment and one is wanting to find out more.
One is ‘assuming I know I proceed’,
the other is ‘wishing to know I proceed’.”
– TKV Desikachar commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 6

Pratyāhāra is not feeding the minds identification with the senses……

pratyahara

Pratyāhāra is not feeding the tendency of the Citta to automatically form a positive, negative, or neutral identification with whatever stimuli the senses present to it. From that we can begin to understand how their external gathering activities stimulate our conscious and especially, unconscious choices.

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There is always Rāga, it just depends where we are in ourselves……

srimad_bhagavad_gita

There is always Rāga, it just depends where we are in ourselves in terms of a spectrum of being.
Thus Rāga can express itself within the spectrum of being as either a state of Jñāna Rāga
or a state of Kleśa Rāga or, as happens mostly, somewhere twixt the extremes of the two.
Either way according to TKV Desikachar’s teaching, progress is not possible without the drive of the emotional forces, they are the horses that pull the chariot.
As to which of the two paths (Jñāna Rāga or Kleśa Rāga) we find ourselves veering towards depends on our skill as a charioteer, coupled with our understanding of the nature of the forces/horses,
as well as the essential nature of the ‘food’ we ‘choose’ to feed them on.
Hence Desikachar’s quote:
“Each person has two forces Rāga and Dveṣa.
They are there to serve you, not you them.”
– TKV Desikachar on Bhagavad Gītā Chapter Three verse 34

T Krishnamacharya Commentaries on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 1-4

T Krishnamacharya aged 91

T Krishnamacharya Commentaries on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 1-4

 Yoga Sūtra Chapter One Title
samādhi pādaḥ

“The Yoga Sūtra is divided into four chapters.
The first chapter, called Samādhi Pādaḥ,
assumes the aspirant has progressed adequately to be in a state called Samāhita.
Such a person is not easily agitated.
They have a clearer perception to comprehend concepts such as Īśvara and Vairāgya.”

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Vāsanā is an unconscious motivation directed towards……

vasana

Vāsanā is an unconscious motivation directed towards
satisfying a physiological or psychological need.”
Commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 8

The power of the breath……

prana

“The power of the breath,
the power of the senses and
physical strength of the body are each distinct properties.
They should not work against each other
but rather contribute to each others well being.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30

A Bhāvana doesn’t depend on the reality of what I fix upon……

bhavana

“A Bhāvana doesn’t depend on the reality of what I fix upon.
I can direct my Bhāvana to a real sensation,
such as the contact between my feet and the ground, for instance.
But I could easily imagine myself in good health,
when in reality I am ill.”
– ‘Concerning the Cakra’ by TKV Desikachar

Bhāvana means that I create for myself a place, an idea, an image……

bhavana

Bhāvana means that I create for myself a place,
an idea, an image, a vision
and I direct my attention towards it.”
– ‘Concerning the Cakra’ by TKV Desikachar

Meditation must elevate the mind.

dhyana

Meditation must elevate the mind.
That is its basic purpose, to be where I was not.
This involves an ascent of the individual’s mind.”
TKV Desikachar Madras 1988

According to Patañjali even when you have something in front of you……

uparaga

“According to Patañjali,
even when you have something in front of you,
you may not see it.
Even when you don’t have something in front of you,
but you want to see it,
you will see it.
Everything depends on YOU.”
TKV Desikachar Madras 1988

Yoga is Nirodha of the different activities and fluctuations of the mind……

nirodha

“What is Yoga?
Yoga is Nirodha of the different activities and fluctuations of the mind,
the leader of the senses.
Nirodha is to completely cover.
Thus this Sūtra implies the Nirodha of involvement of the mind in objects
that distract from a chosen direction of contemplation.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

All actions are not rooted in Kleśa……

klesa

“All actions are not rooted in Kleśa.
Those done when Kleśa are subdued produce joy.
Others produce different degrees of agony.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 14

Depending on whether the mind is in a state of Samādhi or not……

samadhi

“Depending on whether the mind is in a state of Samādhi or not,
the person enjoys permanent happiness or successive chains of unhappiness and happiness.
Those who accept nothing short of Samādhi, freedom from the suffering of disease is realised.
After all, the root cause of disease is the disturbed mind,
when we cannot distinguish right from wrong or good from bad.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 34

Haṭha Yoga is about Nāḍī Śodhana…….

sodhana

Haṭha Yoga is about Nāḍī Śodhana.
Rāja Yoga is about Citta Śodhana.

2017 Art of Sūtra Psychology Course Module Four – Vibhūti Pādaḥ

IWYS_M1

Exploring Chapter Three of the Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali

This Art of Sūtra Psychology Modular Course is limited to a maximum of five students to allow for a personalised approach and in-depth transmission between teacher and student. It is offered as a 4 day course modulecomprising two 2 day meetings over 3-4 months.

Based in the Cotswolds, it offers an in-depth study of Chapter Three of the Yoga Sūtra. It is presented with the aim of reflecting the fundamentals of Śrī T Krishnamacharya’s teaching, namely, transmission occurs through the direct experience of the teacher with the students personal practice and study Sādhana.

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Yoga is awareness, a type of knowing.

TK_1980a

“Yoga is awareness,
a type of knowing.”
– T Krishnamacharya 1988

It appears that Modern Therapeutic Yoga is increasingly angled at……

cikitsa

It appears that Modern Therapeutic Yoga is increasingly angled
at looking at the problems in front of the person
in terms of Yoga for What,
rather than looking at the person behind the problems
in terms of Yoga for Who.

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Online Textual Study Modular Programme Options

121 Lessons

The aim is to reflect the fundamentals of Śrī Krishnamacharya’s teaching, namely, transmission occurs through the direct experience of the teacher with the students personal textual study Sādhana.

Online Modular Textual Study Programmes

Over time my online support work with Yoga practice or supervision has evolved following requests from students for online ongoing textual study, exploring specific topics or themes such as Sūtra Psychology, Haṭha Energetics, Gītā Scripture, Upaniṣat Mysticism,  Sāṃkhya Philosophy and Āyurveda Lifestyle.

After much reflection as to the place of this medium as a means of Paramparā I chose to accept to work online individually with students in this area. With the support of the extensive study workbooks from my textual study group courses, this has become a means of working online 121 to facilitate access to studying texts accumulated from my decades long apprenticeship with TKV Desikachar.

Current Online Modular Textual Study Programmes on offer are:

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Sūtra Mālā – A Thread of Pearls on Yoga Chapter One verses 1-4

Patanjali_B_and_W

Chapter One Samādhi Pādaḥ

First Theme Nirodha or Containment verses 1-4

verse 1
Now,
Follow the Teachings of Yoga.

verse 2
Yoga arises from the containment of,
Our propensity to fluctuate.

verse 3
From this state,
Clarity of being,
As vision is from the source of perception.

verse 4
At all other times,
We identify with the fluctuations.

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Yoga Sūtra Chapters One to Four Study Workbook

Patanjali Yoga Sutra

The Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali Chapters One to Four

Samādhi Sādhana Vibhūti Kaivalya Pādaḥ

A Romanised Saṃskṛta verse by verse word by word personal study support workbook for all four chapters of the Yoga Sūtra. Further workbooks are available for each individual chapter as well as this combined version.

For those wishing to use this workbook as a personal study guide then exploring the online Yoga Sūtra verse by verse translation with its added individual word by word translation and cross verse reference index links may be helpful. These translations are also accumulating online verse by verse commentaries from T Krishnamacharya and TKV Desikachar.

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To experience Āsana is to meld the Mastery of outer Stillness to the……

Āsana_16

To experience Āsana is
to meld the Mastery of outer Stillness to the world
into the Mystery of inner Openness to the beyond.
– Reflections on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 46

Rāga – Something in us needs to be satisfied.

raga

Rāga – Something in us needs to be satisfied.”
– TKV Desikachar 1997 on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 7

The mind is like a glass through which we perceive……

raga

“The mind is like a glass through which we perceive.
When it is painted there is Rāga.
Often the painting colours what we see.
It is the colour of the mind that decides the quality of perception.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4