Does the object of meditation affect the ‘I’?

dhyeya

Question: Does the object of meditation affect the ‘I’?
“The characteristics of the object go into the meditator.
The Dhyeya (object or question) is very important,
it influences the meditator,
for whatever one is linked to,
its through the mind.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras 1988

I do not reject the concept of meditation without a question for inquiry……

dhyeya

“I do not reject the concept of meditation without a question for inquiry or an object for meditation,
but how, given the previous definition of meditation,
could we explain the absence of a question or an object in this scheme?
Certainly, if the ‘I’ is not there, there can be no meditation.
Many heads have rolled on this question of objectless meditation and I want to save my head.
It may be possible to meditate without an object but,
personally, I am skeptical that one can.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

Thus Yukti Anumāna or skilful inference through the process of……

The witness cannot be witnessed.
Yoga Sūtra C4 v21

Thus Yukti Anumāna or skilful inference through the process of ne’iti, ne’iti or not this, not that, is seen as a means to understand all except that, which cannot be identified, yet still expresses the essence of existence.

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When an object is invisible, it is not invisible because it is not there……

visaya

“When an object is invisible,
it is not invisible because it is not there,
but because something hides it.
What you seek may be next door,
but you won’t find it precisely because it is next door.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

According to Patañjali, comprehension is dependent opon two things……

apeksa

“According to Patañjali (Yoga Sūtra C4 v17), comprehension is dependent upon two things:
1. Your interest
and
2. The proximity of the object.
Apekṣā is the interest of the Puruṣa for the object.
The success of Dhyāna depends on the force (Śakti) of the Puruṣa
that pushes the mind to direct itself towards an object.
Without interest, there is no question and no answer.
If you have the interest, you will discover the proximity.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

How does the ‘I’ influence Dhyāna?

dhyana

Question: How does the ‘I’ influence Dhyāna?
“Patañjali’s Yoga Sūtra, which describes every aspect of mental activity,
provides an answer to this question…….”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

Patañjali
 was 
very 
prophetic, 
because 
he spoke
 not 
only
 of……

Patañjali
 was 
very 
prophetic,
because 
he spoke
 not 
only
 of 
yesterday’s 
mind,
but 
also
 of
 tomorrow’s.
His 
message 
concerns 
clarity,
and it 
will 
become 
more 
and 
more 
pertinent
 as
 time 
goes 
by,
because 
people 
are 
now
 questioning 
much 
more 
than
 before.”
TKV Desikachar France May 1999

The Yoga Sūtra become as if metaphysical Mantra when they can be……

Patanjali Yoga Sutra

Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 28
tat-japaḥ tat-artha-bhāvanam |
That repetition is for cultivation of its purpose.
“The Yoga Sūtra become as if metaphysical Mantra,
when they can be an internal intonation,
as well as an external edification.”

Avidyā is the illusion of recognising the……

avidya

Avidyā is the illusion of recognising:
the ephemeral as the eternal,
the profane as the profound,
pain as pleasure and
the silhouette as the source.”
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

Once again, let me remind you that Dhyāna is……

dhyana

“Once again, let me remind you that Dhyāna is:
1. The ability to establish a contact with an object.
2. The ability to prolong this contact so as to create a link both ways.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

Prāṇāyāma is the interface between Āsana and Dhyāna and an important……

Prāṇāyāma is the interface between Āsana and Dhyāna and an important (missing?) link in the evolution of one towards the other.

Since Dhyāna cannot occur without an object of concentration……

dhyana

“Since Dhyāna cannot occur without an object of concentration,
there must be an area (Deśa) where you fix your mind.
So, first you have to fix or bind (Bandha) your mind on a particular place (Deśa), a chosen object; this is known as (Deśa Bandha as in YS C3 v1).
And second, the mind should establish a relationship with this object which should last, at least, for a moment.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

Perhaps the best explanation of Dhyāna is given by Patañjali in……

dhyana

“Perhaps the best explanation of Dhyāna is given by Patañjali in the Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verses One and Two, where he states that one must first fix the question (Dhāraṇā) and then link to it (Dhyāna).
One who is not able to fix the question is not able to succeed in Dhyāna.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

We need to begin with a definition of Dhyāna……

dhyana

“We need to begin with a definition of Dhyāna.
Dhyāna involves an individual and a question or object.
On a simplest level, what happens between the individual and that question or object is the beginning of Dhyāna.
It can be any question, but it must be one question.
There must only be one channel between the “I” and the question, not multi-channels.
The “I” must temporarily drop the other interests and there must be a question.
There is no Dhyāna if there is no question or object.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

In the Vedic tradition, meditation – the need to reflect on something in……

dhyana

“In the Vedic tradition, meditation
– the need to reflect on something in order to understand it better
– is necessary for happiness.”
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

Dhyāna means ‘to look for something new on a specific subject’.

dhyana

Dhyāna means ‘to look for something new on a specific subject’.
TKV Desikachar Madras December 19th 1988

Let us examine the Yoga Sūtra……

samyama

“Let us examine the Yoga Sūtra……
In the 3rd chapter there is the idea of Saṃyama (C3 v4) or the Sādhana of regularly involving the attention of the person towards a specific object or idea.
There are certain Sūtra which tell us of certain powers or clarity developed through Saṃyama.
When a person has reached a certain level of attention he can pursue one examination within his individual capability for a certain period of time.”
TKV Desikachar France 1983

Patañjali reminds us of the pitfalls of the illusion of……

avidya

Patañjali reminds us of the pitfalls of the illusion (Avidyā) of
recognising (Khyāti) psyche (Anātma) as awareness (Ātma).
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

Legend of Patañjali – Dhyānaṃ Ślokam for Yoga Sūtra

patanjali-1

It was learnt by heart as a Bhāvanam for Dhyānam,
to create a meditational mood linked to Patañjali prior to commencing,
either chanting practice or textual study of the Yoga Sūtra.
As taught to TKV Desikachar by T Krishnamacharya.
From Paul’s chant study recordings of TKV Desikachar
– Link to page with Downloadable Translation or with Chanting notations and sound file of Opening Prayers

From Meditation (Dhyānam), arises Integration (Samādhi), merging the……

dhyana

From Meditation (Dhyānam),
arises Integration (Samādhi),
merging the experience of,
Moments of Containment (Nirodha Kṣana)
without Transformation (Pariṇāma).

Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 1-4 epitomise our Yoga Journey in……


Link to download this post as a PDF

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Another important point is that these Sādhana have steps……

sadhana

“Another important point is that these Sādhana have steps.
One can go from one Siddhi to another Siddhi.
Each step of Sādhana is also a Siddhi.
On that premise Yoga Citta Vṛtti Nirodha is at every step a Sādhana and a Siddhi.”
TKV Desikachar France 1983

AG Mohan on Krishnamacharya’s Vaiṣṇavite commentary on the Yoga Sūtra.

Yogavallī, T Krishnamacharya’s commentary on the Yoga Sūtra, looking at the text from his personal Vaiṣṇavite viewpoint of Viśiṣṭādvaita or qualified non-dualism (One of the three primary schools of Vedānta).

Let us go into Siddhi, here the important word is Samādhi……

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

“Let us go into Siddhi, here the important word is Samādhi.
Unless we are born like that, then it’s a Siddhi, Samādhi is a Siddhi.
When we are in a state of absorption in something we are in Samādhi.
After which we appreciate the object in question and understand it more clearly.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

Often when we are talking about Yoga we are not sure whether we……

Often when we are talking about Yoga we are not sure whether we are talking about Sādhana or Siddhi

“Often when we are talking about Yoga
we are not sure whether we are talking about Sādhana or Siddhi.”
TKV Desikachar France 1983