A Mantra is only a Mantra if it is special and secret……

mantra

“A Mantra is only a Mantra if it is special and secret,
and has been personally bestowed by someone
with whom you have a special relationship.
It must be pronounced properly”
– TKV Desikachar 1980

Learning Support for Chanting Āyātu Varadā

mantra

Learning Support for Chanting Āyātu Varadā
– Taittirīya Upaniṣad Chapter 4 verse 41 – Āyātu Varadā
From my personal library of recordings from my studies with my teacher TKV Desikachar recorded by one of his senior chant students Sujaya Sridhar.
To Download or Listen
To Download the Chant Sheet with Romanised Saṃskṛta and Notations

Even Mantra are classified into Guṇa…..

mantra

“Even Mantra are classified into Guṇa.
This needs to be considered when using Mantra for the individual.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras November 24th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

The Art of Personal Sādhana Programme 2017-2019

TaraYantraWeb

The Art of Personal Sādhana Programme 2017 for small groups of around five students in the Cotswolds to support Personal Studies in the following fields:

The Art of Personal Sādhana – One Weekend Workshop and Two Weekend Course Modules

Complete in themselves they explore Yoga Practice, Theory, Psychology and Philosophy by focusing on supporting a developmental structure for our Practice and Study and, if relevant, future Professional Training.

A Development Structure for a Personalised Yoga Practice and Study Sādhana involves:

  • Āsana practice and theory
  • Prāṇāyāma practice and theory
  • Mudrā practice and theory
  • Dhyānam practice and theory
  • Adhyayanam (chanting as learning or meditation) practice and theory

Supported by a Personalised Textual and Oral Study Sādhana involving:

  • Experiential application of the practice and theory principles in the Haṭha Yoga texts.
  • Experiential application of the Yoga Psychology principles through the Yoga Sūtra.
  • Guidance with linking other Indian texts and teachings to Yoga study and practice.
  • Experiential study of the core energetic, constitutional, diagnostic and lifestyle principles in Āyurveda.

For further Information visit: Paul Harvey’s Yoga Studies

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Learning Support for Chanting Closing Śānti Pataḥ – Śaṃ No Mitra

mantra

Learning Support for Chanting the Closing Śānti Pataḥ for Taittirīya Upaniṣad Chapter 1 verse 12
– Śaṃ No Mitra
From my personal library of recordings from my studies with my teacher TKV Desikachar recorded by one of his senior chant students Sujaya Sridhar.
To Download or Listen
To Download the Chant Sheet with Romanised Saṃskṛta and Notations

Learning Support for Chanting Opening Śānti Pataḥ – Śaṃ No Mitra

mantra

Learning Support for Chanting the Opening Śānti Pataḥ for Taittirīya Upaniṣad Chapter 1 verse 1
– Śaṃ No Mitra
From my personal library of recordings from my studies with my teacher TKV Desikachar recorded by one of his senior chant students Sujaya Sridhar.
To Download or Listen
To Download the Chant Sheet with Romanised Saṃskṛta and Notations

Learning Support for Chanting the Śuci Mantra or Prāṇa Apāna – Slow speed

mantra

Taken from the Taittirīya Upaniṣad Chapter 4 verse 67-77, this Mantra was one of T Krishnamacharya’s personal favourites.
Sometimes known as an Ārogya Mantra or Mantra for Health, Krishnamacharya referred to it as the Śuci Mantra or Mantra for Purification and as such should be recited daily as part of our personal Sādhana.
According to Krishnamacharya the verses in the Śuci Mantra describe all the aspects of the human system, which when listed total 108.
The download link is for a slower speed (to help with learning) version of the Śuci Mantra and is from my personal library of recordings from my studies with my teacher TKV Desikachar and he recorded it for me with one of his senior chant students Sujaya Sridhar.
To Download the Chant Sheet with Romanised Saṃskṛta, translation and Chant Notation

Learning Support for Chanting the Prārthanā Ślokam Opening Prayers

svadhyaya_2

Learning Support for Prārthanā Ślokam or Vedic Chanting Opening Prayers (short version).
– The Dhyānam Ślokam here were taught by T Krishnamacharya and transmitted to me by TKV Desikachar with the addition of a prayer that is a homage to Krishnamachrya.

From my personal library of recordings from my studies with my teacher TKV Desikachar recorded by one of his senior chant students Sujaya Sridhar.
To Download or Listen
To Download the Chant Sheet with Romanised Saṃskṛta and Chant Notation

Learning Support for Chanting the Śānti Pataḥ – Saha Nāvavatu

Desikachar and Paul Chanting in 1999

Traditionally textual study or chanting practice was preceded and ended with a Śānti Pataḥ or invocatory passage to help forge a link between the chanters, what is chanted and its purport, as well as setting a context for textual study.

This chant is where the teacher and the pupil chant together asking for harmonious co-operation within a context of keen and vigorous exploration of what is and especially what isn’t the self and the non-self. A topic fraught with potential resistances and self-illusion.

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Learning Support for Chanting the Durgā Suktam

durga

Learning Support for Chanting the Durgā Suktam
– From the Taittirīya Upaniṣad Chapter 4 verse 11-13
From my personal library of recordings from my studies with my teacher TKV Desikachar.
To Download or Listen
To Download the Chant Sheet with Romanised Saṃskṛta, English Translation and Chant Notations

Śraddhā can’t be taught, but can be kindled.

sraddha

Śraddhā can’t be taught,
but can be kindled.”
– From my notes studying Taittirīyra Upaniṣad Chapter Three verse 5 with TKV Desikachar

What does reflecting on our relationship with Manomaya reveal?

manomaya

What does reflecting on our relationship with Manomaya reveal?
In other words what relationship do we have with our Saṃskāra or habitual patterns?
– Taittirīya Upaniṣad Chapter Three Bhṛguvallī verse 3

What does reflecting on our relationship with Prāṇamaya reveal?

pranamaya

What does reflecting on our relationship with Prāṇamaya reveal?
– Taittirīya Upaniṣad Chapter Three Bhṛguvallī verse 2

What does reflecting on our relationship with Annamaya reveal?

annamaya

What does reflecting on our relationship with Annamaya reveal?
– Taittirīya Upaniṣad Chapter Three Bhṛguvallī verse 1

In Mīmāṃsā there is a word called Prayoga (connection)……

mantra

“In Mīmāṃsā (a philosophical system to interpret the Veda, especially the Brāhmaṇa and Mantra, with the object of correctly performing the Veda rituals) there is a word called Prayoga (connection).
The same Mantra has to be recited differently for different rituals.
Or different Mantra in the same ritual.
So even here different applications are needed, the ancients recognised this.
There is a verse which says that if the Mantra is not used correctly it has the opposite effect and destroys or boomerangs.
Instead of doing good it will harm.
This is Mithyā Prayoga (wrong connection) with an opposite effect.
Having spoken of viniyoga (appropriate application), now looking at important points the old teachers used to convey these ideas.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

Although Krishnamacharya came from a strict Indian tradition……

TK_1980_aged_91

T Krishnamacharya at 91

“Although Krishnamacharya came from a strict Indian tradition,
he liberated the restrictions.
He segregated his personal beliefs from his teaching
and his interest in the different texts on Yoga and Vedānta.

It isn’t necessary to be a Hindu to practice Yoga,
the Hindu text, the Brahma Sūtra refute Yoga.
In the Yoga Sūtra of Patañjali God is not emphasised.

Hindus have taken advantage of Yoga,
Brahmin rituals use Yoga breathing,
even if it is only symbolic and they use Mantra.

Krishnamacharya didn’t mix the different teachings,
he didn’t start a class with prayers when he worked with foreigners.”
From study notes with TKV Desikachar England 1992

Yoga – To Link to myself. Hinduism – To Link to God.

yoga

Yoga – To Link to myself.
Hinduism – To Link to God.”
– TKV Desikachar introducing the Taittirīya Upaniṣad 2001

Rāmānuja, Yāmunācarya, Krishnamacharya and Viśiṣṭādvaita

Ramanuja_embracing_Lord_Varadaraj

Rāmānuja, was a disciple of Śrī Yāmunācarya. Śrī Yāmunācarya, composer of texts such as the Gītārtha Saṃgraha, Siddhi Traya and Stotra Ratna, was the grandson of the 9th century sage Śrī Nāthamuni and a forebear of T Krishnamacharya.

Krishnamacharya’s personal devotional philosophy and practices were grounded in the teachings that arose from these great sages and evolved into what became known as Viśiṣṭādvaita or qualified non-dualism (One of the three primary schools of Vedānta).

“Rāmānuja agrees with the Advaitin that the scripture teaches the non-twoness (Advaita) of reality.
But, he denies the Advaitan’s conclusion that this oneness is attributeless, pure being or consciousness and that plurality with regard to soul and material world is falsely imposed on this one Being due to ignorance.”
Rāmānuja on the Yoga – Dr. Robert C Lester 1976.

Prārthanā Ślokam – Śuklām Opening Verse with Translation

Vināyaka

This prayer is used most often as an opening verse or Prārthanā Ślokam – Request Verse.

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