Compare and discuss the effects of Samavṛtti and Viṣamavṛtti breathing ratios……

Āsana and Prāṇāyāma Theory Question 9.

baddha_konasanadhyanamjanu_sirsasana

Compare and discuss the effects of Samavṛtti and Viṣamavṛtti breathing ratios
on Prāṇa Sthāna and Apāna Sthāna.
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Compare the techniques and functions and applications for Śītalī and Sītkārī.

Āsana and Prāṇāyāma Theory Question 8.

sitali

Compare the techniques and functions and applications for Śītalī and Sītkārī.
Especially with regard to their effects on Agni.
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What are Kapālabhāti and Bhastrikā and why use them?

Āsana and Prāṇāyāma Theory Question 7.

dhyanamnadi_sodana

What are Kapālabhāti and Bhastrikā?
Compare and discuss their effects on Prāṇa Sthāna and Apāna Sthāna..
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Discuss the structural and/or systemic functions of Matsyendrāsana……

Āsana and Prāṇāyāma Theory Q5

matsyendrasana

Discuss the structural and/or systemic functions of Matsyendrāsana,
basing your response on the teaching in the Haṭha Yoga Pradīpikā.
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What does reflecting on our relationship with Annamaya reveal?

annamaya

What does reflecting on our relationship with Annamaya reveal?
– Taittirīya Upaniṣad Chapter Three Bhṛguvallī verse 1

General outline on Cikitsa Krama……

cikitsa

“General outline on Cikitsa Krama.
More sophisticated than Śikṣaṇa Krama.
Already when you know an object it is seen differently by different people.
So when I offer a healing object it is seen as a cause of disease by others.
One mind can influence minds differently,
because different minds receive things differently.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

It is the student in us that must realize ‘Avasthānam’…..

This post continues from the quote below posted in January 2013:

“These days there is lots of talk on what is involved in training to be a Yoga Teacher,
however little talk on what is involved in training to be a Yoga Student.”

Developing this further I feel it is the student in us that must, through an appropriate Sādhana received within an auspicious context with a teacher, realize ‘Avasthānam’ in that the ‘Svarūpa’ or the ‘own character’ of the inner student ‘takes up its place’.

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Talking about the alternative healing system……

Claude Paris 1999
Claude Marachel:
Talking about the alternative healing system, I think we have to be very careful. Sometimes in Western countries, we see that everything is mixed. In the field of alternative systems, a lot of Viveka or discernment is needed.

TKV Desikachar:
What has happened to some of these alternative systems of therapy, including Yoga, is that things have become a bit shallow.

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I am very impressed by what you said about your father giving some……

Desikachar_France_1999

Viniyoga in Italia:
I am very impressed by what you said about your father giving some students an oil bath. Do you think that sometimes a Yoga teacher needs to give a massage or has to touch the student?
TKV Desikachar:
Well, if a person comes with a backache, you have to examine him or her. You have to touch the person and feel the person. As a part of observation, we need to do that. Sometimes as a part of encouragement we can do that. At times, I take the pulse, so they feel that I care. But I have not and I don’t like to massage our students. I always ask the family to do that.
Viniyoga in Italia:
It could also create a dependence.
TKV Desikachar:
Not only that, but if you do it for one, you will have to do it for others. I want the students to be on their own. It is an education in Svastha.
– TKV Desikachar from an interview in the Journal Viniyoga Italia on Yoga and Well Being.

Do you think it is important for Yoga teachers to mention diet and……

TKV_5

Question to TKV Desikachar:
Do you think it is important for Yoga teachers to mention diet and lifestyle to students?

TKV Desikachar Response: 
As you know, here in Madras, when people come to the Krishnamacharya Yoga Mandiram or to me personally, they come because they have some problem. Every day they come, every day with some problem. If we have a problem, especially if it is a chronic problem, it is both in the body and in the mind, whether it manifests as asthma, diabetes, headache, or blood pressure. Thus we cannot help but talk about everything. That is why we, here in Madras, need to know something about Āyurveda, Yoga and western medical science. For these reasons our teachers are taught physiology, anatomy, Āyurveda and Yoga.

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In this context what about Āyurveda?

TKV_5

Viniyoga in Italia: In this context what about Āyurveda?

TKV Desikachar: Āyurveda, is, in my opinion, the most complete system of life God ever created, because it encompasses everything in nature. And it is a positive system of health. It is called Āyurveda, or knowledge of life. I have no hesitation to say that this system takes into account every aspect, it is not only medicine, not only food, not only life-style, but it is also the philosophy, the religion and the mantra-recitation. I have never come across a system that is so complete for the health of the body as Āyurveda. Unfortunately, it is nearly dead. We don’t have many people. Because Āyurveda is so complete and vast that a doctor would need an enormous experience.

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Today in Europe there is a going back to what is called alternative……

Viniyoga in Italia: Today in Europe there is a going back to what is called alternative medicines, like herbal treatment and the traditional dietary laws, thermal baths and other traditional treatments. Do you think these traditional approaches have a relevance in today’s world?

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Āyurveda & Yoga – Dravya and Rasa, Substance and Taste within Food – Part 9 of 12

ĀYURVEDA & YOGA

“All food is medicine, all medicine is food.”

Āyurveda was the one of the first medical systems to realise the crucial importance of the kind of food we eat and to appreciate the interaction between health and disease, disease and food, and food and health. It will be from this point that this article will explore the question of diet by examining the concepts of elements and taste in food.

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You should only take that food which you would offer to the person you revere most.

annam

“You should only take that food which you would offer to the person you revere most.”
Notes from my studies of the Dhyānamālika verse 11 with TKV Desikachar in Chennai 23rd December 2000

Āyurveda & Yoga – Dhātu & Mala, Body Tissues and Means of Elimination – Part 8 of 12

ĀYURVEDA & YOGA

Previous articles have presented some ideas of Prāṇa so we can now move towards presenting a more complete picture of how Āyurveda sees the human body. This article looks at how Ayurveda sees the types of bodily tissues and waste products as vital to the effective construction and working of the body.

YOGA AND INDIAN THOUGHT

Yoga is a word that has, within Indian thought, many meanings. To define the word Yoga is very difficult as the word is so adaptable.

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Āyurveda & Yoga – Prāṇa and its links within Āyurveda – Part 7 of 12

ĀYURVEDA & YOGA

This article intended to introduce Prāṇa, its origin, function and malfunction. However, Prāṇa is such an important part of Yoga and Āyurveda that I have concentrated on presenting some basic ideas on its relationship to the individual, to Yoga and to the understanding of life known as Āyurveda.

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Āyurveda & Yoga – Prāṇa & The Five Aspects of Each of the Tridoṣa – Part 6 of 12

ĀYURVEDA & YOGA


This article introduces the concept of Prāṇa and its place in Āyurveda within the three principles or Tridoṣa.

YOGA AND INDIAN THOUGHT

Generally the purpose of Yoga is to bring about a change within the prominence of awareness and its subsequent impact on the attitude and function of the individual.

Whether this change is a yoking of opposites or an unyoking of two aspects, seemingly inseparable, time and a process are involved. Also this notion of change may be initiated within an individual’s physical body or emotional responses and mental attitude.

However, within Indian thought there is a concept that is common to the different philosophies and to the different aspects of the individual. This concept is the presence and action of Prāṇa.

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Āyurveda & Yoga – The Tridoṣa The Human Constitution & The Ageing Process – Part 5 of 12

ĀYURVEDA & YOGA

This article explores the balance of the Three Principles in the individual and their effect on the processes of change and age.

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Āyurveda & Yoga – The Triguṇa The Tridoṣa & The Human System – Part 4 of 12

ĀYURVEDA & YOGA

This article explores the relationship between the three principles or Tridoṣa, with the three qualities or Guṇa, and how Āyurveda views their qualities and modes of expression in the functions of the body.

One of the threads that links Āyurveda and Yoga with the Vedic schools of thought and non-Vedic schools such as Buddhism, is that everything is subject to change.

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Āyurveda & Yoga – The Pañca Bhūta The Das Indriya & The Tridoṣa – Part 3 of 12

ĀYURVEDA & YOGA

“Now is Āyurveda explained:
the expression of the five elements,
and the three principles most fundamental to life.”

So far in this series we have presented some ideas on the place of Yoga within Indian thought, with comments on the problems in distinguishing the different threads in the tapestry that holds together the cultural, religious and philosophical ideals of India.

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Āyurveda & Yoga – A Common Philosophical Background in Sāṃkhya – Part 2 of 12

ĀYURVEDA & YOGA

A Series of articles exploring Yoga and Āyurveda. This one looks at the philosophical structure within Sāṃkhya upon which the principles supporting the ancient Indian system of medicine are based.

The previous article on Āyurveda and Yoga began with a brief introduction to Indian thought and its links with Yoga. It is sometimes difficult, living within our western culture, to recognise what is Yoga and what is not Yoga.

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Āyurveda & Yoga – Linking the Two Arts – Part 1 of 12

ĀYURVEDA & YOGA

There is an increasing interest in the field of traditional Indian medicine. Until recently little was available in the West on this subject, but now there are many more avenues though which one can explore and learn about the form of holistic medicine known as Āyurveda.

Traditionally Āyurveda and Yoga went hand in hand, so for students of Yoga an understanding of Āyurveda will complement and help their Yoga study and practice.

Furthermore in the application of Yoga as a therapy (cikitsa) an understanding of Āyurveda is essential in working with imbalances that can cause or aggravate the disease process.

In this article some ideas will be presented on the links between Yoga and India’s spiritual tradition before presenting the background to Āyurveda.

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