Links to Teachings from Śrī T Krishnamacharya and TKV Desikachar

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A Reference list on teaching resources around Śrī T Krishnamacharya and TKV Desikachar.

Today, my teachers 78th Birthday, is again one of mixed emotions and reflections on his life and although his mental and, I am led to believe, physical health is increasingly fragile these days, it’s hard to talk about honouring his birthday when I/we have no real idea as to how he actually is or even if he is in a condition to know about it, let alone appreciate birthday wishes and greetings from those around the world who care.

However within this poignant question of how or even where Desikachar is in himself, I remain eternally grateful for the intimacy and vitality of the years between 1979 and 2002 we shared together as teacher and pupil working within 121 lessons in his home, during my thirty plus study and practice stays in Madras

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Introduction to the Yoga Makaranda by TKV Desikachar

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Introduction to the Yoga Makaranda by TKV Desikachar

Extract from the issue of KYM Darśanam published in November 1993,
it was written by TKV Desikachar as an introduction to a serialisation of the Yoga Makaranda
which ran over 10 issues of the magazine until February 1996.

“I would like to bring to the notice some important aspects of this book to help understand the context in which it was written and to avoid misinterpretation.

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Principles behind why Krishnamacharya only taught adults 121……

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“There is another practical thing, it is like what we call Vinyāsa.

At different times, he (Krishnamacharya) has said that any teaching must have the following conditions:

First, from where is the student coming? What is called Deśa. Is he from America, or is he from North India? Teaching must consider whether the person is from one country or another.

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T Krishnamacharya answers students questions……

baradavajrasana

A selection of the questions asked over the years by his students,
together with Krishnamacharya’s responses.
– Originally published by the KYM Darśanam May 1994

YOGAKSHEMAM – founded by TK Sribhashyam, third son of Krishnamacharya

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YOGAKSHEMAM
A School of traditional teaching of Indian Philosophy, Ayurveda and Yoga
founded by TK  Sribhashyam, the youngest son of T Krishnamacharya,
has announced the publication of an e-Newsletter.

Dear Reader,
We are happy to announce the birth of our Newsletter “Yogakshemam e-Newsletter” on the 2016 Epiphany day. It would be free and open to all. To be respectful to the environment, we interrupt the paper edition and launch the digital version. We are sure that you will appreciate this gesture as well as the contents.
To begin with, this version will have some articles of philosophical interest,
including one in memory to my father, Sri T. Krishnamacharya.
We plan to publish the e-version every two months.
– Letter from Sribhashyam

The first edition can be found here.
My thanks to Sriram, student of Desikachar, for the his email letting me know.

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Ten Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

Unlike the later redacted edition, re-published in 1995 as the ‘Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice’, it captures the evolution of the retreat with the days lectures and Q & A dialogues as they alternated between ‘lectures on the principles and purposes of Yoga and discussions related to the practice of Yoga with special reference to the postures and the breathing techniques’.

TKV Desikachar, in his forward to the original version wrote:

“These lectures and discussions, printed words put before persons I might never meet,
are but reflections of that deeper result that grew out of a living face-to-face encounter.
Coming to learn of Yoga only through reading leaves much to be desired.
Yet, something worthwhile about Yoga might be shared through the medium of the printed word.”

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter 10 Theory: Prāṇāyāma – Pages 133-144

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Religiousness in Yoga: Study Guide Compilation Chapters One to Nine

Religiousness in Yoga

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

TKV Desikachar

Lectures on Theory and Practice

Chapter by Chapter Study guide

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

Unlike the later redacted edition, re-published in 1995 as the ‘Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice’, it captures the evolution of the retreat with the days lectures and Q & A dialogues as they alternated between ‘lectures on the principles and purposes of Yoga and discussions related to the practice of Yoga with special reference to the postures and the breathing techniques’.

TKV Desikachar, in his forward to the original version wrote:

“These lectures and discussions, printed words put before persons I might never meet,
are but reflections of that deeper result that grew out of a living face-to-face encounter.
Coming to learn of Yoga only through reading leaves much to be desired.
Yet, something worthwhile about Yoga might be shared through the medium of the printed word.”

A compilation of the chapter by chapter study guides is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

This compilation Guide currently contains Chapters One to Nine. Future updates will be posted as the remaining Nine Chapters Study Guides are added.

View or Download the Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide Compilation of Chapters One to Nine

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Nine Practice

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

Unlike the later redacted edition, re-published in 1995 as the ‘Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice’, it captures the evolution of the retreat with the days lectures and Q & A dialogues as they alternated between ‘lectures on the principles and purposes of Yoga and discussions related to the practice of Yoga with special reference to the postures and the breathing techniques’.

TKV Desikachar, in his forward to the original version wrote:

“These lectures and discussions, printed words put before persons I might never meet,
are but reflections of that deeper result that grew out of a living face-to-face encounter.
Coming to learn of Yoga only through reading leaves much to be desired.
Yet, something worthwhile about Yoga might be shared through the medium of the printed word.”

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter 9 Practice: The Practical Aspects of Prāṇāyāma – Pages 117-131

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A great number of postures, notably most standing postures, have……

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A great number of postures, notably most standing postures, have doubtless come to us directly from the Professor, who would have introduced them as appropriate to the needs of modern times.

Amongst the standing postures, uttānāsana, parśva uttānāsana, utthita trikoṇāsana and utthita parśva koṇāsana, are examples which the Professor himself codified.”

– Claude Marachel was a long serving and senior student of TKV Desikachar over 33 years from 1969-2002. This is an extract from Claude talking about what Desikachar told him about his father, Krishnamacharya.

Personal picture showing T Krishnamacharya and BKS Iyengar sitting together……

Whilst living in Madras from 1979-1981 I was at an event in Chennai in June 1980 where BKS Iyengar was invited to give a Yoga lecture and Āsana demonstration in a tribute to his Guru T Krishnamacharya.

Krishnamacharya consented to attend as the guest of honour and I was able to take a number of personal photos during this event, including Mr Iyengar demonstrating Āsana.

This particular picture shows T Krishnamacharya and BKS Iyengar sitting together during the salutary addresses.

The Biomechanics of Śīrṣāsana

sirsasana

The Biomechanics of Śīrṣāsana – Article by TV Raghu Ananthanarayanan a former teacher at the Krishnamacharya Yoga Mandiram.

Downloadable as a PDF
– Originally published in KYM Darśanam February 1994

Religiousness in Yoga Study Guide: Chapter Eight Theory

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

‘Religiousness in Yoga: Lectures on Theory and Practice’ by the University Press of America,
a transcript of recordings of a one month Yoga Programme in Colgate University in 1976, published in 1980.

Unlike the later redacted edition, re-published in 1995 as the ‘Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice’, it captures the evolution of the retreat with the days lectures and Q & A dialogues as they alternated between ‘lectures on the principles and purposes of Yoga and discussions related to the practice of Yoga with special reference to the postures and the breathing techniques’.

TKV Desikachar, in his forward to the original version wrote:

“These lectures and discussions, printed words put before persons I might never meet,
are but reflections of that deeper result that grew out of a living face-to-face encounter.
Coming to learn of Yoga only through reading leaves much to be desired.
Yet, something worthwhile about Yoga might be shared through the medium of the printed word.”

A chapter by chapter Study guide is offered below with added verse and word cross-references where possible to support a a deeper linking with the teachings within these lectures and Q & A sessions.

Chapter Eight Theory:
Yama, Niyama and Āsana – The First Three Aṅga of Yoga
– Pages 107-115

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Did T Krishnamacharya’s forebear Yāmunācarya visit Kashmir?

Shri Yamunacharya

This one is for aficionados of T Krishnamacharya’s personal and ancestral Sampradāya or Vaiṣṇavite tradition of Viśiṣṭādvaita, as well as interest in research into the lives of his forebears, in this case Śrī Yāmunācārya.

‘Did Yāmunācarya visit Kashmir’, is an article by V Varadachari first published in The Journal of Oriental Research Madras in 1992.

To View or Download this article as a PDF

This possibility was also discussed by the renowned scholar and practitioner of Kashmir Shivaism, Mark Dyczkowski, in his book ‘The Doctrine of Vibration’ on Page 2 and expanded regarding Yāmunācarya and Kashmir in the footnotes on page 221.

All in all this serves to remind us of the eminent lineage and potent ancestry that fed Krishnamacharya’s lifelong relationship with the teachings of his forebears Śrī Nāthamuni and Yāmunācārya.

As well as his dedication to other important Viśiṣṭādvaita teachers within his Sampradāya, such as TKV Desikachar’s fourteenth century namesake Veṅkaṭanātha DeśikaVeṅkaṭanātha Deśika was an eminent Śrī Vaiṣnava Guru, a poet, devotee, philosopher and master-teacher.

Krishnamacharya named his son TKV Desikachar with the Tirumalai and Krishna relating to the village of origin and immediate family title and Veṅkaṭanātha Deśikachar after Veṅkaṭanātha Deśika, hence TKV Desikachar.

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Online Personalised Live Learning Programme

121 Lessons

The aim is to reflect the fundamentals of Śrī Krishnamacharya’s teaching, namely, transmission occurs through the direct experience of the teacher with the students personal practice and study Sādhana.

Online Individualised Learning within a Personal Dialogue

Over the past decade, with the advent of online video technologies, I have found myself increasingly involved in virtual teaching situations with Yoga students and Yoga teachers. Here I have offered 121 video meetings to facilitate a personalised approach and in-depth transmission between teacher and student.

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Yoga Yatta – A chance to chat around your questions on Yoga

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I am receiving an increasing number of emails from around the globe regarding questions and requests for clarification around Yoga practice, theory and philosophy.

I talk more easily than I type and I also feel direct contact and dialogue is much more preferable to a keyboard based to’ing and fro’ing of views, opinions or questions.

Also we live increasingly in an age where direct face to face, albeit via screen and speaker, contact is possible through media such as Skype, FaceTime, WebEx, etc.

Hence I am proposing an offering of time and space using modern media to engage in a direct dialogue with your questions or requests for clarification with those interested.

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A collation of articles by Srivatsa Ramaswami around the teachings of T Krishnamacharya

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A collation of articles by Srivatsa Ramaswami around the teachings of
T Krishnamacharya published in the ‘Indian Review’ circa 1979-1981.

View or Download this Series of Articles as a Single PDF Collation

List of Articles and Indications of Content:

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There are also fundamental differences between Yoga and Vedānta……

Desikachar and Krishnamacharya in Madras 1980

Desikachar and Krishnamacharya in Madras 1980

There are also fundamental differences between Yoga and Vedānta. And, if at all we can link them, it is as follows: Yoga is a means towards Vedānta for those who are interested.

Vedānta involves a lot of enquiry and reflection, and also demands the development of Bhakti, and, for both the mind and for the individual, Yoga is the means towards Bhakti.

Also, Vedānta is Jñāna Mārga, and a state of mind that is necessary for Jñāna can only come through the practice of Aṣṭāṅga.”

– TKV Desikachar from lectures on ‘The Yoga of T Krishnamacharya’, given at Zinal, Switzerland 1981.

Thanks to him, it is possible to say that there are certain distinctions between Yoga and Hinduism.

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T Krishnamacharya @ 91

“Thanks to him, it is possible to say that there are certain distinctions between Yoga and Hinduism.”

– TKV Desikachar from lectures on ‘The Yoga of T Krishnamacharya’, given at Zinal, Switzerland 1981.

It is only through a deep understanding of family life that one can go beyond it…….

Desikachar and Krishnamacharya Chanting Madras 1980

Desikachar and Krishnamacharya Chanting Madras 1980

“He insists that it is very important for a human being to go through family life. It is only through a deep understanding of family life that one can go beyond it.

He, himself, twice rejected the position of an important Ācārya because, he said, he would like to remain with his family.”

– TKV Desikachar from lectures on ‘The Yoga of T Krishnamacharya’, given at Zinal, Switzerland 1981.

Ordinary people need certain forms, certain visualisations, for Dhyāna……

svastikasana

“Then, he has also some views on Dhyāna. Since Dhyāna is a characteristic of mind, and since the mind is limited to form, Deśa, or the object of meditation, must be Saguṇa and not Nirguṇa.

Ordinary people need certain forms, certain visualisations, for Dhyāna, so any Dhyāna which is Nirguṇa is only Vikalpa.”

– TKV Desikachar from lectures on ‘The Yoga of T Krishnamacharya’, given at Zinal, Switzerland 1981.

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