Can these four Yoga Aṅga be practiced by everyone at every stage of life?

anga

“Can these four Yoga AṅgaYama, Niyama, Āsana, Prāṇāyāma
– be practiced by everyone at every stage of life?
How often and how long should one practice?
How can we adapt our practice to changing circumstances?
These questions and others like them must be answered by a competent teacher,
according to each student’s individual circumstances.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30

What is unpleasant is not desired…….

dvesa

“What is unpleasant is not desired.
The response of the mind is then to move away from it.
Whether in fact such a step did prevent Duḥkha is not immediately evident.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 8

The Guru must judge how serious is the desire……

mantra

“The Guru must judge how serious is the desire and the faith
and then teach the Mantra that he considers most appropriate.
In any event,
he needs to know that it may be that there will be no positive result,
because a lot depends on the attitude of the student.”
T Krishnamacharya

T Krishnamacharya Commentaries on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 1-4

T Krishnamacharya aged 91

T Krishnamacharya Commentaries on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verses 1-4

 Yoga Sūtra Chapter One Title
samādhi pādaḥ

“The Yoga Sūtra is divided into four chapters.
The first chapter, called Samādhi Pādaḥ,
assumes the aspirant has progressed adequately to be in a state called Samāhita.
Such a person is not easily agitated.
They have a clearer perception to comprehend concepts such as Īśvara and Vairāgya.”

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Svabhāva is Karma Vāsana.

srimad_bhagavad_gita

Svabhāva is Karma Vāsana.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Bhagavad Gītā Chapter Five verse 14

The power of the breath……

prana

“The power of the breath,
the power of the senses and
physical strength of the body are each distinct properties.
They should not work against each other
but rather contribute to each others well being.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30

Yoga is Nirodha of the different activities and fluctuations of the mind……

nirodha

“What is Yoga?
Yoga is Nirodha of the different activities and fluctuations of the mind,
the leader of the senses.
Nirodha is to completely cover.
Thus this Sūtra implies the Nirodha of involvement of the mind in objects
that distract from a chosen direction of contemplation.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

All actions are not rooted in Kleśa……

klesa

“All actions are not rooted in Kleśa.
Those done when Kleśa are subdued produce joy.
Others produce different degrees of agony.”
– T Krishnamacharya on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 14

Depending on whether the mind is in a state of Samādhi or not……

samadhi

“Depending on whether the mind is in a state of Samādhi or not,
the person enjoys permanent happiness or successive chains of unhappiness and happiness.
Those who accept nothing short of Samādhi, freedom from the suffering of disease is realised.
After all, the root cause of disease is the disturbed mind,
when we cannot distinguish right from wrong or good from bad.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 34

Yoga is awareness, a type of knowing.

TK_1980a

“Yoga is awareness,
a type of knowing.”
– T Krishnamacharya 1988

Disciples often show themselves as changeable……

mantra

“Disciples often show themselves as changeable.
One day they are passionately interested in studying this or that Mantra
and the next day they have lost interest.”
– T Krishnamacharya

Look at the present moment, what is gone is gone.

TK_1980a

“Look at the present moment,
what is gone is gone.”
– T Krishnamacharya

All mental distractions arise from the free play of the senses and……

indriya

“All mental distractions arise from the free play of the senses
and only through continuing practice can one keep their power in check.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 18

In the case of a person whose mind is calm……

TK_1980a

“In the case of a person whose mind is calm and free from disturbances,
there is the integration of the person who meditates,
the mind which is utilised for meditation
and the object that is meditated upon.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 41

There are essentially three causes for fear….

abhinivesa

“There are essentially three causes for fear….
desire, disease and death.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 9

What is the nature of distraction?

itaratra

“What is the nature of distraction?”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4