The practice which is Śodhana for the Antar Aṅga is Antaraṅga Sādhana.

“The practice which is Śodhana for the Antar Aṅga
is Antaraṅga Sādhana.”
– T Krishnamacharya introduction to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three

Dhyāna is an activity of a mind dominated by Sattva linked to Ātma…….

dhyana

Dhyānam is an activity of a mind
dominated by Sattva linked to Ātma.
So Ātma and Sattva required for Dhyānam to occur.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Three verse 2

Tapas is an offering for something else, not a deprivation.

Tapas is an offering for something else, not a deprivation.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Bhagavad Gītā Chapter Four verse 28

What is Samādhi?

“What is Samādhi?
It is the ability to experience the true nature of the objects of Meditation,
through a mind rid of the provocation of excitability and inactivity.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 20

Duḥkha is the mental activity that brings impurities into the……

Duḥkha is the mental activity
that brings impurities into the heart,
thus disturbing it.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 31

Bhāvana is a beneficial attitude that is consciously cultivated……

bhavana

Bhāvana is a beneficial attitude that is consciously cultivated,
despite tendencies to the contrary”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 33

Right Yoga is a vine of pleasant fragrance……

TK_1980a

‎”Right Yoga is a vine of pleasant fragrance.
Wrong Yoga is a sharp pointed arrow – avoid it.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 3

This is why we recite Mantra to these two stars…..

mantra

“The moon,
whose rays are auspicious for the gathering of medicinal herbs,
is the god of herbs,
whilst the light of the sun gets to the bottom of all impurities.
This is why we recite Mantra to these two stars,
during the preparation of Āyurveda remedies.”
– T Krishnamacharya

Each person possesses a body……

isvara

“Each person possesses a body.
Encased in the body, as it were, he goes through pain and pleasure.
The pain and pleasure through the body arises because of contact with the external world.
However such variations of pain and pleasure do not happen to one absorbed in Īśvara.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 50

All Āsana cannot be mastered by any one individual.

Āsana_61a

“All Āsana cannot be mastered by any one individual.”
– T Krishnamacharya 1984

Viparyaya or mental activity that is based on something other than fact……

viparyaya

“Even when our understanding is consistent with our perception or repeated experience,
it does not necessarily indicate a fact.
For instance,
if we assume that a person is a woman simply because that person is dressed in a woman’s clothes,
this is called Viparyaya or mental activity that is based on something other than fact.
Viparyaya, then, is comprehension based on a perceived characteristic in the observer,
which leads to false assumptions.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 8

Svādhyāya implies what the tradition teaches……

svadhyaya_2

Svādhyāya implies what the tradition teaches or a teacher has taught as studies.
Thus, it does not necessarily mean that they should read and recite Veda.”
– T Krishnamacharya 1984

There are different grades of inclination and possibility…..

samadhi

“There are different grades of inclination and possibility
among those who are interested to experience the state of Samādhi.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 21

Patañjali lists the nine kinds of obstacles that are confronted……

antararya

“In this Sūtra,
Patañjali lists the nine kinds of obstacles that are confronted by those who,
though fit and able to meditate on Īśvara, neglect to do so.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 30

Jñāna is like a sword to cut away Saṃśaya.

jnana

Jñāna is like a sword to cut away Saṃśaya.”
– T Krishnamacharya commentary on Bhagavad Gītā Chapter Four verse 41

Avidyā and Freedom do not exist together……

avidya

Avidyā and Freedom do not exist together.
Here Avidyā represents both the basis and attitude towards our action.
The aim of Yoga is to reach that state where our actions are not based on Avidyā.”
– T Krishnamacharya’s commentary to Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 25