When Saṃskāra takes one view and Pariṇāma another, there……

duhkha_5

“When Saṃskāra takes one view and Pariṇāma another there is friction.
Coming to Madras is Pariṇāma,
being unable to have those things you had before causes friction.
When you want those things you are used to through Saṃskāra,
then the Pariṇāma which caused this can bring Duḥkha.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Pariṇāma is change and can be from one moment to the next……

parinama

Pariṇāma is change and can be from one moment to the next.
Suppose we are listening to music we like, a Saṃskāra or tendency,
and something happens to jar the appreciation.
The change is immediate and opposite to how we were.
Thus the Saṃskāra of listening to a particular style of music causes friction when there is change.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Ones own actions can develop or make one Guṇa prominent……

guna

“Ones own actions can develop or make one Guṇa prominent.
Thus we can plan or practice Āsana or Prāṇāyāma to promote one Guṇa.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras November 24th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

The mind has the characteristics that make other things possible……

samskara

“The mind has the characteristics that make other things possible.
To develop tendencies or Saṃskāra.
The mind can also adapt and change or Pariṇāma.
Saṃskāra is the opposite of Pariṇāma.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

In Yoga is is said that everything that happens is from the mind……

citta

“In Yoga it is said that everything that happens is from the mind.
Citta is the mindstuff, the perceptual mechanism.
That which makes us see and remember.
Vṛtti is the activity, transformation, motion, modification, that is caused in Citta.
The mind is the main function for seeing,
without it the senses are useless.
The mind can develop words or ideas.
The mind can remember.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

In Sāṃkhya it is said that every problem comes from the Guṇa……

guna

“In Sāṃkhya it is said that every problem comes from the Guṇa and their interplay.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Everything we see has three qualities or natures.

guna

“Everything we see,
including the instrument of Mind (Citta),
has three qualities or natures.
In Saṃskṛta they are known as Guṇa.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 1st 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Meditation can be related to the Guṇa…..

dhyana

“Meditation (Dhyāna) can be related to the Guṇa.
The object of our inquiry must be related or,
in accordance with what we want to produce.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 1st 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

The practice of Yoga can influence the Guṇa……

guna

“The practice of Yoga can influence the Guṇa.
i.e. The room where you practice can affect the Guṇa by photographs, colour of paint, smell.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 1st 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

All matter has the three qualities or Guṇa

guna

“All matter has the three qualities (Guṇa).
The effects can be based on what we see, eat, hear,
and the effects of what we see, eat, hear.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 1st 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Its the combination (of Guṇa) thats important……

guna

“Its the combination (of Guṇa) thats important.
There is the simile of the oil lamp in the Sāṃkhya Kārikā Śloka 13.
The cotton wick – Light Property (Sattva)
The basin or bowl – Heavy Property (Tamas)
The oil – Flows this way or that (Rajas)
The moment you dip the cotton in the oil it takes on that property.
Thus the Guṇa work together to produce the flame.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras November 24th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Even Mantra are classified into Guṇa…..

mantra

“Even Mantra are classified into Guṇa.
This needs to be considered when using Mantra for the individual.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras November 24th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

The problem is in the mind and the key is in the mind.

“The problem is in the mind
and the key is in the mind.”
– TKV Desikachar

Once I am very clear about what is to be known – Svadharma

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“Once I am very clear about what is to be known – Svadharma,
then I can be clear about what is universal Dharma.”
– TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

We should be careful if we feel very enthusiastic……

Desikachar_1999_1

“We should be careful if we feel very enthusiastic,
because it could distort the spirit of the teaching.”
TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

What is the role of Dharma in the face of survival?

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“What is the role of Dharma in the face of survival?”
– TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

How do you measure if something is important?

TKV_USA_3a1

“How do you measure if something is important?”
TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

Śraddhā is essential for progress, whether in Yoga or……

sraddha

Śraddhā is essential for progress, whether in Yoga or any other endeavour.
It is a feeling that cannot be expressed or intellectually discussed.
It, however, is a feeling that is not always uncovered in every person.
When absent or weak, it is evident through the lack of stability and focus in a person.
Where present and strong, it is evident through the commitment, perseverance and enthusiasm the person exhibits.
For such a person, life is meaningful.”
– TKV Desikachar

We must treat first the condition that bothers the mind.

“We must treat first the condition that bothers the mind.”
– TKV Desikachar

The model of the Nāḍī and Cakra can never help to explain……

anahata

The human energetic system is very complex and it is even harder to understand the mind, the structure, the limitations and possibilities, the relationship with the body and vice versa.

On the other hand, we can easily say to someone that there are seven Cakra, that they are like this or that, that there are found here or there in the body etc in all simplicity. But we must be aware if we do that we haven’t really said anything, and the person will not be any the wiser.

The risk of confusion is even greater when we try to show the model of the Cakra scientifically, or to give spiritual characteristics some sort of scientific basis. Some try to do this, by linking Mūladhāra with the kidneys or the sacral plexus, or Viśuddhi with the thyroid, etc.

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The Cakra are points of concentration for the mind.

anahata

“The Cakra are points of concentration for the mind.”
– ‘Concerning the Cakra’ by TKV Desikachar

If you don’t know your strength, then you can be easily influenced.

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“If you don’t know your strength,
then you can be easily influenced.”
TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

The less the depth of Saṃkalpa, the less the depth of what follows.

samkalpa

Saṃkalpa is a serious intention between and both from teacher and student.
The less the depth of Saṃkalpa, the less the depth of what follows.
Once this is there what is required is Saṃskāra.
Saṃskāra is to remove the obstacles.
In a way it is Viyoga, so that certain things that get in the way are put aside.
Saṃskāra is like cleaning a vessel before you cook.
Saṃyoga is where something begins to happen.
The accumulation of what begins to happen between teacher and student is Saṃyoga.
Proportionate to the quality of the three, the output will be different”
TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

The more they (the student) like you, the more they become attached.

raga

“The more they (the student) like you,
the more they become attached.”
– TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998

If you feel the strength, you’ll find the way.

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House

“If you feel the strength,
you’ll find the way.”
TKV Desikachar speaking with his senior Western students London 1998