Yoga is the movement of the mind in one direction. It presumes……

TKV_France_1999

“Yoga has many meanings in the Bhagavad GītāUpaniṣat, Saṃskṛta Grammar, etc.

It is defined again in the Sūtra. Yoga is the movement of the mind in one direction. It presumes:

1. There is something in each of us called mind.
2. This mind has many movements or activities.
3. It is possible to channelise these movements through certain actions.
4. When we accept movement we accept time and space – moving something from A to B. There are realities.
5. In accepting vṛtti we also accept the idea of an object.
6. We can fix the mind so it confines itself to an object.”

– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

Sometimes we should examine how we relate to objects through the senses.

TKV_France_1999

“Sometimes we should examine how we relate to objects through the senses.”
– TKV Desikachar commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 35

When a person is free, it means that things outside of himself are not as disturbing

“There is a human state called Kaivalya. That is, a person is free.
When a person is free, it means that things outside of himself are not as disturbing as they were in the past.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Three Page 42

When we see the truth, when we reach a point that is higher than ourselves……

“When we see the truth, when we reach a point that is higher than ourselves,
there is a deep satisfaction.
It is not the emotional satisfaction that we get from looking at a beautiful object,
but a satisfaction deep within us that is without emotion or sentiment.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Three Page 32

In Yoga one of the first levels of Prajñā, wisdom, is the awareness and understanding that we are disturbed……

duhkha_5

“In Yoga one of the first levels of Prajñā, wisdom,
is the awareness and understanding that we are disturbed.
It is the first truth that we need to understand
because very often Duḥkha goes unrecognised.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Three Page 41

Very often people have this type of Duḥkha even when they are trying to improve their lives……

Duḥkha

“When we see something that we want and are able to get it, there is no Duḥkha.
If we are unable to to get it, this is the beginning of Duḥkha.
Very often people have this type of Duḥkha even when they are trying to improve their lives.
They become so thirsty for understanding that they are unable to get understanding as quickly as they desire.”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter Three Page 39

The greater the Śraddhā, the more meaning there is in the techniques such……

sraddha

“The greater the Śraddhā, the more meaning there is in the techniques such as Āsana, Prāṇāyāma, Dhyānam, Bhāvana and all the others. Without Śraddhā, these techniques have little effect on the state of the mind and the progress to Citta Vṛtti Nirodha.

However, sometimes some minor benefits that we get through Āsana or Prāṇāyāma practice, open up the Śraddhā within us. Śraddhā is within each of us but is covered. It could be any experience that uncovers it.”

– TKV Desikachar on Śraddhā in the Yoga Sūtra

When a person begins to do something with Śraddhā, with conviction, why does this very often dissipate?

sraddha

Question:
When a person begins to do something with Śraddhā, with conviction, why does this very often dissipate?

Response from TKV Desikachar:
Because Śraddhā influences the mind from within. But the mind has also to continually interact with the external. In the course of these interactions, the mind will often come in contact with situations that evoke other responses that are contrary to the original conviction. When the Śraddhā, conviction, is not strong enough, the mind will follow the contrary response. Over time the original conviction may even be forgotten.

A person may want to keep his voice in good shape and for this reason decide to stop having ice-cream. He may even faithfully follow this for a while. Then somebody brings home a carton of a new ice-cream recently introduced, of a quality never eaten in India before. His interest is aroused and he finds many reasons why the ice-cream can be had: ‘the friend has gone through so much difficulty to get it for rne’, ‘it is a special occasion and the whole atmosphere of the occasion will be spoilt if I refuse’, ‘I will just sample it once to know what its like’ and so on. The voice is forgotten, and the person eats the ice-cream thereby strengthening the contrary response and weakening the Śraddhā.

– TKV Desikachar on Śraddhā in the Yoga Sūtra

Failures on the path do not reduce their enthusiasm or their efforts…..

sraddha

“When there is Śraddhā, the person is not disappointed on failing to get immediate benefits.
They are sure that it is only a question of time and so the failures on the path do not reduce their enthusiasm or their efforts.”
– TKV Desikachar on Śraddhā in the Yoga Sūtra

Śraddhā will give life to all the means that are in the Yoga Sūtra.

sraddha

Śraddhā will give life to all the means that are in the Yoga Sūtra.”
– TKV Desikachar on Śraddhā in the Yoga Sūtra

Śraddhā is the source of motivation

sraddha

Śraddhā is the source of motivation.”
– TKV Desikachar on Śraddhā in the Yoga Sūtra

When there is Śraddhā, the person is not disappointed on failing to get immediate benefits.

sraddha

“When there is Śraddhā, the person is not disappointed on failing to get immediate benefits.”
– TKV Desikachar commenting on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 20

Clarity and confusion follow each other in cycles……

TKV Desikachar teaching at Gaunts House“In the Yoga Sūtra it is said that in the beginning of one’s Sādhana,
clarity and confusion follow each other in cycles, like a wave form”
– TKV Desikachar Religiousness in Yoga Chapter One Page 9

Prāṇāyāma is possible only after a reasonable mastery of Āsana.

seated_pranayama_2

“It (Prāṇāyāma) is possible only after a reasonable mastery of Āsana Practice.”
– Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 49 by TKV Desikachar 1987

Viveka is to be able to understand and appreciate opposites.

viveka

Viveka is to be able to understand and appreciate opposites.”
– TKV Desikachar 1980

Sthira Sukha should both be present in Āsana……

sthirasukha

Sthira Sukha (Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 46) should both be present in Āsana.
It also implies one should be able to choose the breath ratio.”
– TKV Desikachar England 1980

Śraddhā is essential for progress, whether in Yoga or……

sraddha

Śraddhā is essential for progress, whether in Yoga or any other endeavour.
It is a feeling that cannot be expressed or intellectually discussed.
It, however, is a feeling that is not always uncovered in every person.
When absent or weak, it is evident through the lack of stability and focus in a person.
Where present and strong, it is evident through the commitment, perseverance and enthusiasm the person exhibits.
For such a person, life is meaningful.”
– TKV Desikachar

Sthira Sukham Āsanam – Means what happens before and after a posture……

sthirasukha

Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 46 Sthira Sukham Āsanam
“Means what happens before and after a posture.
One should be able to move to another posture with ease.
– TKV Desikachar England 1980

The relationship we have developed with the fruits of our actions is……

The relationship we have developed with the fruits of our actions

“The relationship we have developed with the fruits of our actions is Īśvara Praṇidhānā
TKV Desikachar France 1983

īśvara Praṇidhānā – What is our attitude towards our own action?

What is our attitude towards our own action?

Īśvara Praṇidhānā
What is our attitude towards our own action?”
TKV Desikachar France 1983

Let us go into Siddhi, here the important word is Samādhi……

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

Picture courtesy of KYM Archives

“Let us go into Siddhi, here the important word is Samādhi.
Unless we are born like that, then it’s a Siddhi, Samādhi is a Siddhi.
When we are in a state of absorption in something we are in Samādhi.
After which we appreciate the object in question and understand it more clearly.”
– TKV Desikachar France 1983

Pages: 1234567