These problems in our observation are related to the mixing of…..

tkv_6a

“These problems in our observation are related to the mixing of:

Vikalpa:
Imagination is already there operating when we begin to observe.
All the more that we are better and better informed about what we should see, etc.

Viparyaya:
Because of the past Saṃskāra, there is a sort of perversion in observation.

Smṛti:
Memory is, unfortunately, never factual.

Finally, we should never forget that all conclusions are wrong, because things change.
Hence the importance of private lessons, which allow for more flexibility.”
– TKV Desikachar 1981

Rāga – Something in us needs to be satisfied.

raga

Rāga – Something in us needs to be satisfied.”
– TKV Desikachar 1997 on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 7

The mind is like a glass through which we perceive……

raga

“The mind is like a glass through which we perceive.
When it is painted there is Rāga.
Often the painting colours what we see.
It is the colour of the mind that decides the quality of perception.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

Unless there is a shift from Manas to Citta it is not possible to do Dhāraṇā……

dharana

“Unless there is a shift from Manas to Citta,
it is not possible to do Dhāraṇā.”
– TKV Desikachar 1998

If there is not a strong link to that which is inside……

drastr

“If there is not a strong link to that which is inside,
the stronger force becomes the outside,
and we are pulled by and to that.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

It is not possible for everyone to reach the same level of meditation……

dhyanam

“It is not possible for everyone to reach the same level of meditation (Dhyānam),
even meditation should be taught or presented in stages (viniyoga).
It should be used at a level suitable to the student and gradually increased,
start simply and increase in complexity.
This is dependant on the growth of the student and according to the purpose.”
– From study notes with TKV Desikachar England 1992

Krishnamacharya would introduce the Sūtra philosophy when……

sutra

Krishnamacharya would introduce the Sūtra philosophy
when students were resting during an Āsana practice,
because he felt that this was the only time they had available to them.”
From study notes with TKV Desikachar England 1992

Avidyā is anything else other than Vidyā.

avidya

Avidyā is anything else other than Vidyā.”
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 3
– TKV Desikachar January 1997

Whatever perceives is always right……

drastr

“Whatever perceives is always right,
it is the mind that colours what we see.”
– TKV Desikachar 1979 on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

Śraddhā: What holds, what nourishes……

sraddha

Śraddhā:
What holds, what nourishes.
As a mother with a child.”
– TKV Desikachar commenting on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 20

Yoga directs the mind to what is happening now.

atha

“Yoga directs the mind to what is happening now.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

Yoga presumes for most people that mind is the same……

citta

“Yoga presumes for most people that mind is the same,
always planning ahead or basing itself on what has happened.”
TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 4

Pain and suffering are linked……

duhkha_5

“Pain and suffering are linked,
but no more pain does not necessarily mean no more suffering.
There are people who have a little pain and a lot of suffering.
However, there are others who, despite a lot of pain, suffer very little.
What is it that can do this? ”
– TKV Desikachar from unedited manuscript for ‘What are We Seeking?’

Whether Yoga is Sādhana or Siddhi?

sadhana

“Whether Yoga is Sādhana or Siddhi?
Sādhana is the means to achieve something.
Siddhi is where something has happened.
For Siddhi to happen there has to be Sādhana, some preparation, some effort.
So how is it possible for something to be both Sādhana and Siddhi?
Each gain we make is a Siddhi.
Each Siddhi helps us to go further with Sādhana.”
TKV Desikachar France 1983

The mind is subject to change or Pariṇāma and as such can be channelised.

TKV_France_1999

“The mind is subject to change or Pariṇāma and as such can be channelised.
Certain movements can be emphasised or de-emphasised.”
– TKV Desikachar on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 2

Any technique that can help to pacify suffering is wonderful……

“Any technique that can help to pacify suffering is wonderful,
but unfortunately only temporary.
Any technique that will develop clarity is precious,
since it contributes to resolving the cause of suffering .”
– TKV Desikachar from unedited manuscript for ‘What are We Seeking?’

The learning process is only possible with Pariṇāma.

parinama

“The learning process is only possible with Pariṇāma.
Remembering what you have learned is only possible with Saṃskāra.”
– TKV Desikachar Madras December 8th 1979 on Sāṃkhya and Yoga

Clarity is the ability to see clearly three things and to understand them….

Clarity is the ability to see clearly three things and to understand them:
the cause, the effect and that which knows both the cause and the effect.”
– TKV Desikachar from unedited manuscript for ‘What are We Seeking?’

Recognising AND accepting one’s Duḥkham is the first……

prajna

“Recognising AND accepting one’s Duḥkha is the first Prajñā.
Once you have accepted this you are free to find out where it is coming from.”
– TKV Desikachar January 9th 1999

Patañjali says that the problem is fed by internal elements……

TKV_France_1999

“Patañjali says that the problem is fed by internal elements,
by the search for immediate benefits in life,
by external elements and
by the psychic nature of the person.”
– TKV Desikachar

Duḥkha is the expression of a problem……

duhkha_5

Duḥkha is the expression of a problem.
Duḥkha is an emotion,
it could be an illusion.”
From study notes with TKV Desikachar England 1992

Where a person wants to grasp the true nature of the I……

sraddha

“In the Yogavallī, T Krishnamacharya’s commentary on the Yoga Sūtra,
Śraddhā has been seen in a different, very interesting way.
In it, he has said that Śraddhā is a symbol for a special meditation
and he calls this meditation, Ahaṃ Graha Upāsana.
Aham is the I, Graha is to grasp and Upāsana is to stay near.
Where a person wants to grasp the true nature of the I,
it is called Ahaṃ Graha Upāsana.”
– TKV Desikachar on Śraddhā in the Yoga Sūtra

The arrangement of Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two involves four components….

Patanjali_3

“The arrangement of Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two involves four components:
1. Duḥkha
What is it that I want to avoid?
2. Avidyā/Saṃyoga
Association or from where has this come?
3. Kaivalya/Viveka
Where should we be in order to be free from this association?
4. Viveka/Aṣṭāṅga
What is the way?
What is the discipline that will give Viveka,
not just for a moment, but there all the time?
This is the place of Yoga.”
– TKV Desikachar January 9th 1999

A quiet mind can be told where to go……

TKV_5

‎”A busy mind is always telling you where to go.
A quiet mind can be told where to go.”
– TKV Desikachar January 2nd 1998

Nothing destroys Vāsanā, only they become ineffective.

vasana

‎”Nothing destroys Vāsanā,
only they become ineffective.”
– TKV Desikachar January 11th 1995

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