It is ironic when a collective term used to describe an approach……

It is ironic when a collective term used to describe
an approach to teaching an individual,
becomes an individual term used to describe
an approach to teaching a collective.

Yoga is more about looking inwards at what we fear most…….

Yoga is about looking inwards,
at what we fear most.
Rather than looking outwards,
at what we desire most.

I find myself reflecting on the notion of ‘authentic lineage’……

I find myself reflecting on the notion of ‘authentic lineage’, often taught within the statement of Paramparā or ‘from one to another’ as in a succession from teacher to student et al. Both from questions asked of me and questions I have around what I see, generally within the world of ‘Modern’ Yoga and more specifically emerging around the claims on facets in the evolution of TKV Desikachar’s teaching over four decades.

Currently I see various representational phrases being used in modern organisational setups around pupils or students of TKV Desikachar such as ‘Influenced by the Teaching of…..’ or ‘The Living Tradition of…..’ or ‘The Lineage of……’ as if a provenance of authority alluding to authenticity, studentship and tradition.

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What are the concepts of Sṛṣṭi Krama, Sthiti Krama and Anta Krama?

 

What are the concepts of Sṛṣṭi Krama, Sthiti Krama and Antya Krama and what is their significance in relationship to the practice of Āsana, Prāṇāyāma and Dhyānam?

We can approach these three concepts and the question of their relationship with practice from a chronological and within that, a psychological viewpoint. According to the Yoga teachings from T Krishnamacharya there are three chronological and accompanying psychological stages of life, or Tri Krama.

1. The first Krama is the stage of growth and expansion known as Sṛṣṭi Krama. Here, chronologically, the starting point is the age from which people traditionally began the Āsana aspect of Yoga practice.

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A sign of a maturing in our relationship with a 121 Yoga Teacher is……

In the novice phase of our relationship with a 121 Yoga Teacher,
it’s not so much about what we bring to the Lesson,
it’s more about what we take away from the Lesson.

A sign of a maturing in our relationship with a 121 Yoga Teacher,
is that we accept more responsibility for what we bring to the Lesson,
being a determining factor in what we take away from the Lesson.

The continued effort of the Breath is that which gives life……

Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 47
prayatna-śaithilya-ananta-samāpattibhyām |
Both relaxation of continued effort and unity in infinity.”

When working with the Breath in Āsana its perhaps less appealing initially,
but ultimately more attractive, satisfactory and effective,
to integrate  a focus of Samāpatti (Unity) of
Śaithilya (Relaxation) in Ananta (the Infinite),
through a developmental Sādhana (Means to Accomplish)
on the Siddhi (accomplishment) of Dīrgha or Length,
supported by Sūkṣma or Subtlety.

From Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 47 T Krishnamacharya taught that:
– the common denominator for successfully uniting (Samāpatti)
both (Bhyām) aspects of relaxation (Śaithilya) and the infinite (Ananta)
within the practice of Āsana is the Breath.
He saw it as Prayatna (continued effort)
and synonymous with Jīvana (giving life).
The continued effort of the Breath is that which gives life.

Our continued efforts with the Breath in Āsana
is that which helps enliven our various levels of interaction with
our inner and outer worlds as expressed through the Pañca Maya.

Ātma is the source of the sunlight in the Psyche.

Ātma is the source of the sunlight in the Psyche.”

Its potentially complex these days when something taught……

Its potentially complex these days when something taught to an individual student,
in a personalised, age and situation relevant context;
within a specific environment and epoch;
becomes the ‘gold’ standard for groups of students to follow ‘faithfully’,
through respecting every inch of the formal nuances.

Equally, its potentially complex these days when something taught to a group of students,
in a generalised, open aged and multi-need context;
within a non-specific trans-national environment and epoch;
becomes the ‘gold’ standard for individual students to follow ‘faithfully’,
through respecting every inch of the formal nuances.

Reflect the essence of each of the first eleven Sūtra in Chapter One…

Patanjali_3

Yoga Sūtra Study Question:

Identify and list one key word that reflects the essence of each
of the first eleven Sūtra in Chapter One of the Yoga Sūtra.

To Download or View this Question as a PDF Study Sheet

Before there can be Yoga or linking there must be Viyoga……

viyoga

“Before there can be Yoga or linking there must be Viyoga or unlinking.
What are we prepared to unlink from in order to link?”

Our relationship with Food can be too little, too much, or wrong…..

annam

“Our relationship with Food can be too little, too much, or wrong.
According to Āyurveda, even the best food eaten in the wrong amount,
or at the wrong time, or with the wrong attitude
will fail to nourish and even disturb the system.
The same could be said for Yoga Practice.”

The presence and actions of Prāṇa Śakti……..

The presence and actions of Prāṇa Śakti

Generally the purpose of Yoga is to bring about a change within the prominence of awareness and its subsequent impact on the attitude and function of the individual.

Whether this change is explored as a yoking of two opposites, as in Prāṇa and Apāna, or an unyoking of two seemingly inseparable aspects, as in Puruṣa and Prakṛti, time and a process are involved. Also this notion of change may be initiated within an individual’s physical body, energetic processes, mental attitude and emotional responses.

However, within Indian thought there is a concept that is common to the different philosophies and to the different aspects of the individual. This concept is the presence, power and actions of Prāṇa.

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Svādhyāya – to look at that which helps me understand.

svadhyaya_2

Svādhyāya – to look at that which helps me understand.”
Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 1

Laṅghana Kriyā can be used for pacification or for purification…….


Following on from yesterdays post on Bṛṃhaṇa Kriyā and Laṅghana Kriyā as expansive and contractive activities I felt it could be helpful to republish a post from last year developing the concept and application of Laṅghana Kriyā. There is little published information available on these important concepts that Krishnamacharya drew from Āyurveda and applied through his Yoga teaching. For more on this teaching relationship of Yoga and Āyurveda view ‘The Krishnamacharya methodology of melding the viniyoga of Āyurveda with that of Yoga‘.

Whilst reposting this piece on Laṅghana Kriyā and its application within the teaching concepts of Śamanam Kriyā and Śodhanam Kriyā, I have also added links so the reader can further reference the Saṃskṛta Words Compendium, with its now 750 Saṃskṛta word database cross linking concepts and texts.

Finally the original piece can be downloaded as a PDF and is listed on the Yoga Posts as PDF’s Repository, a further resource now approaching 200 downloadable PDF Links.

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Bṛṃhaṇa Kriyā and Laṅghana Kriyā as Expansive and Contractive potentials…..


Bṛṃhaṇa Kriyā and Laṅghana Kriyā as expansive and contractive activities are two potentials actualised through the Breath and Āsana.

Within the practice of Āsana, Mudrā and Prāṇāyāma they are actualised through an understanding of the primary principles that inform Haṭha Yoga and Āyurveda.

The alchemical process underpinning this understanding is the relationship between the two primary principles of Prāṇa and Agni in order to influence Haṭha Yoga concepts such as PrāṇaApānaNāḍī, CakraAgni and Kuṇḍalinī.

In terms of Bṛṃhaṇa Kriyā and Laṅghana Kriyā, the viniyoga of Bṛṃhaṇa affects a dispersion of Agni from the core to the periphery and the viniyoga of Laṅghana affects a withdrawal of Agni from the periphery to the core.

Understanding the application of this particular process facilitates access, through the Vīna Daṇḍa (spine), Prāṇa and Agni, to energising, cleansing and aligning potentials in the practice of Āsana, Mudrā and Prāṇāyāma.

List five of the key concepts for Chapter One of the Yoga Sūtra in order of appearance

Patanjali_3

Yoga Sūtra Study Question:

List five of the key concepts for Chapter One of the Yoga Sūtra in order of appearance.

To Download or View this Question as a PDF Study Sheet

The search for understanding is driven by misunderstanding……

avidya

“The search for understanding is driven by misunderstanding,
though not always in the right direction.”
– Reflections on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Two verse 5

Prāṇa is the élan vital……

seated_pranayama

Prāṇa is the élan vital.
It is the mover and the sustainer of the body in all living beings.
Because of this all pervasive movement and irrepressible vitality,
it is also hard to keep reined in through the ten sensory horses.
When the personalised field of Prāṇa becomes unreined,
it transforms into Vāta and the system becomes disturbed.
The primary practice in Yoga to minimise the conversion of Prāṇa into Vāta is Prāṇāyāma.”

It is difficult to realise the wonders of Cit within the wanderings of the Citta.

cit devanagari

It is difficult to realise the wonders of Cit
within the wanderings of the Citta.

How to cultivate as intimate a relationship with our Practice……

Āsana_5_web

Yukta Abhyāsa or skilful practice.
How to cultivate as intimate a relationship with our Practice,
as with our Problems.
Commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 14

In Jñāna Dhyānam the most difficult exercise for the mind

dhyanam

In Jñāna Dhyānam the most difficult exercise for the mind
is the one of not exercising the mind.
– Commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter One verse 13

One of the purposes of Yoga is to help us with the challenge……

dharma

One of the purposes of Yoga is to help us with the challenge of
discerning between what is our Dharma and what is our Karma.

The Das Upāya or ten approaches to Sādhana…….

upaya

In introducing the Yoga Sūtra Chapter One Upāya section within verses 2039,
Krishnamacharya talks about Das Upāya or ten approaches,
of which two are Śodhanam (Purifying) Sādhana
and eight are Śamanam (Palliating) Sādhana.

Some people use Yoga to move away from something undesirable……

abhava

“Some people use Yoga (or even training for a career as a Yoga Teacher),
to move away from something undesirable for, or in their lives (Abhāva).
Others use Yoga to move towards something desirable (Bhāva) for, or in their lives.
Either can be positive, however good to be clear about our motives,
especially if our relationship with that which we wanted to move away from,
or that which we wanted to move towards,
changes along the way.”

Vāsanā is an unconscious motivation directed towards……

vasana

Vāsanā is an unconscious motivation directed towards
satisfying a physiological or psychological need.”
Commentary on Yoga Sūtra Chapter Four verse 8